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Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby kush123 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 00:18

iul wrote:Hinato's post auto translated by google:

The Indo Pacific Rugby Championship will have six teams!
http://www.asierugby.net/lindo-pacific- ... quipes.php

So what are the Asian countries or cities that really have the means to integrate this future competition?

- Japan: this seems completely out of place. The Japanese Top League will be held at the same time and has a better quality in comparison. Not to mention that behind, the best Japanese players are engaged with the Sunwolves in Super Rugby. No use to launch a Japanese franchise in Indo Pacific Rugby Championship. It is better, moreover, to give way to the other Asian nations which need it more in order to develop.

- Hong Kong: a 7-a-side rugby club with a highly professional and progressive selection on the Asian and world stage, the Dragons are best equipped to join the Indo Pacific Rugby Championship. The signing of some foreign names would be enough to make this team competitive. Hong Kong also has a mythical stadium (Hong Kong Stadium) with 40,000 seats and therefore has all the necessary infrastructure.

- Malaysia: it is certainly the Asian nation that is experiencing the most dazzling rise in recent years. Malaysian rugby is booming. His selection is still in the running for the 2019 World Cup of rugby in Japan, the country will have its 100% professional championship from 2018 (and its schedule will not compete with the IPRC) and especially the same year future national rugby stadium that could host the home games of its future franchise.

The Malaysian franchise could count as it is known on its incredible reservoir of Fijian players plus a few foreign names and the return of its two expatriates to Japan, winger Marc Le (Hino Red Dolphins) and star and second line Dineshvaran Krishnan (Yamaha Jubilo)!

- South Korea: traditional stronghold of rugby in Asia despite its low number of licensees, the country is stagnating. His best players are professional in Japan and unavailable for selection, barred by the financial strength of the Japanese corporate clubs. The creation of a South Korean franchise would bring all these talents together, make them play together throughout the season and finally have them available for the Sharon Roses.

The signing of some foreign players would make a strong team. Moreover, about 20 South Korean players, not to mention the dozens of Japanese players of Korean origin, currently play on the Japanese archipelago. That is to say the quality reservoir that the franchise could have. Will the Korea Rugby Union finally get involved?

- China: Chinese rugby starts from scratch. His selection to XV has not played for years. And the Chinese Rugby Football Association has just launched a major recruitment campaign for players (Chinese and foreign) for its future professional championship which is due to open in 2018. At the moment, they are not at all ready. Let them work on their side and in the future they will no doubt be able to join the Indo Pacific Rugby Championship.

- Singapore: of all the Asian countries and cities mentioned, it is the one that has the best infrastructures with its Singapore National Stadium of 55 000 places which can have what is more the closed roof. But Singapore has no reservoir of quality players. His selection is currently in Asia Rugby Championship Division 2 (3rd division in Asia) and had been crushed in 2013 by the Japanese U20s 109 to 19. If Singapore is to host a franchise, it would probably be a team from the Pacific Islands (Samoa or Tonga ) that would not have the necessary infrastructure there.


There is a special reason why that championship called as Indo . Sri Lanka is the only "Indo" country among the top 45 rugby playing nations .It would have only called a Pacific championship without Sri lanka i believe

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby Working Class Rugger » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 00:29

kush123 wrote:
iul wrote:Hinato's post auto translated by google:

The Indo Pacific Rugby Championship will have six teams!
http://www.asierugby.net/lindo-pacific- ... quipes.php

So what are the Asian countries or cities that really have the means to integrate this future competition?

- Japan: this seems completely out of place. The Japanese Top League will be held at the same time and has a better quality in comparison. Not to mention that behind, the best Japanese players are engaged with the Sunwolves in Super Rugby. No use to launch a Japanese franchise in Indo Pacific Rugby Championship. It is better, moreover, to give way to the other Asian nations which need it more in order to develop.

- Hong Kong: a 7-a-side rugby club with a highly professional and progressive selection on the Asian and world stage, the Dragons are best equipped to join the Indo Pacific Rugby Championship. The signing of some foreign names would be enough to make this team competitive. Hong Kong also has a mythical stadium (Hong Kong Stadium) with 40,000 seats and therefore has all the necessary infrastructure.

- Malaysia: it is certainly the Asian nation that is experiencing the most dazzling rise in recent years. Malaysian rugby is booming. His selection is still in the running for the 2019 World Cup of rugby in Japan, the country will have its 100% professional championship from 2018 (and its schedule will not compete with the IPRC) and especially the same year future national rugby stadium that could host the home games of its future franchise.

The Malaysian franchise could count as it is known on its incredible reservoir of Fijian players plus a few foreign names and the return of its two expatriates to Japan, winger Marc Le (Hino Red Dolphins) and star and second line Dineshvaran Krishnan (Yamaha Jubilo)!

- South Korea: traditional stronghold of rugby in Asia despite its low number of licensees, the country is stagnating. His best players are professional in Japan and unavailable for selection, barred by the financial strength of the Japanese corporate clubs. The creation of a South Korean franchise would bring all these talents together, make them play together throughout the season and finally have them available for the Sharon Roses.

The signing of some foreign players would make a strong team. Moreover, about 20 South Korean players, not to mention the dozens of Japanese players of Korean origin, currently play on the Japanese archipelago. That is to say the quality reservoir that the franchise could have. Will the Korea Rugby Union finally get involved?

- China: Chinese rugby starts from scratch. His selection to XV has not played for years. And the Chinese Rugby Football Association has just launched a major recruitment campaign for players (Chinese and foreign) for its future professional championship which is due to open in 2018. At the moment, they are not at all ready. Let them work on their side and in the future they will no doubt be able to join the Indo Pacific Rugby Championship.

- Singapore: of all the Asian countries and cities mentioned, it is the one that has the best infrastructures with its Singapore National Stadium of 55 000 places which can have what is more the closed roof. But Singapore has no reservoir of quality players. His selection is currently in Asia Rugby Championship Division 2 (3rd division in Asia) and had been crushed in 2013 by the Japanese U20s 109 to 19. If Singapore is to host a franchise, it would probably be a team from the Pacific Islands (Samoa or Tonga ) that would not have the necessary infrastructure there.


There is a special reason why that championship called as Indo . Sri Lanka is the only "Indo" country among the top 45 rugby playing nations .It would have only called a Pacific championship without Sri lanka i believe


Ah...Perth is nestled up against the Indian Ocean. Hence. Indo. Doesn't necessarily mean a Sri Lankan squad will be involved.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby kush123 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 00:41

Working Class Rugger wrote:
kush123 wrote:
iul wrote:Hinato's post auto translated by google:



Ah...Perth is nestled up against the Indian Ocean. Hence. Indo. Doesn't necessarily mean a Sri Lankan squad will be involved.


interesting i thought when andrew said Indo he wanted to see Indo countries involving in his competition , I wonder why he did not mention any cities from Africa then ? they too nestled up against Indian Ocean i believe and far better rugby playing nations than Sri Lanka

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby Working Class Rugger » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 01:15

kush123 wrote:
Working Class Rugger wrote:
kush123 wrote:
iul wrote:Hinato's post auto translated by google:



Ah...Perth is nestled up against the Indian Ocean. Hence. Indo. Doesn't necessarily mean a Sri Lankan squad will be involved.


interesting i thought when andrew said Indo he wanted to see Indo countries involving in his competition , I wonder why he did not mention any cities from Africa then ? they too nestled up against Indian Ocean i believe and far better rugby playing nations than Sri Lanka


Could be his intent to bring in a SL based franchise. Don't know. Those who do are keeping it pretty under wraps at present. I'm certainly not against the idea. Providing it is done right, has the support and is competitive.

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: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby jonny24 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 02:47

I think rugby could do with a bit of "less is more" . CFL plays 18 games, survives on crowds from 20k-35k (usually) plus TV. So I don't buy that a rugby club needs 25 games to make it work with a much smaller squad. And then each game is more important, more of event.

I also think there's too many competitions going on, especially when they're all overlapping like Europe. They should play straight through a 16-20 game season, playoffs, and then have the ECC serve as an extended international post season. It's so annoying when it changes week to week, especially when different comps are on different channels or subscriptions.
Last edited by jonny24 on Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 04:59, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby ihateblazers » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 02:52

For me the European season drags on too much, around halfway through the season when the international fixtures come along (yes even if it's a lowish percentage of the players) the overall standards and top level quality drops. I don't bother watching club rugby from the six nations till the playoffs. The season just loses all its momentum. It would be so much better if the club season finished before the 6 nations or if there was a reduction in fixtures so that the cross over between the international periods doesn't disrput so much.

Not too mention the length of the season being too lobg for the players mentally and physically for optimum performance.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby thatrugbyguy » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 03:23

Between 16-20 games I think is idea for a domestic rugby competition. I know that home and away is the fairest method for determining a champion in any sport, but I tend to agree that rugby doesn't lend itself to a 30 week domestic season like soccer does.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby kush123 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 04:09

thatrugbyguy wrote:Between 16-20 games I think is idea for a domestic rugby competition. I know that home and away is the fairest method for determining a champion in any sport, but I tend to agree that rugby doesn't lend itself to a 30 week domestic season like soccer does.


Sri Lanka & other asian div 1 countries only playing three games per year atm , so they will say yes please even to be in a domestic competition

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby Thomas » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 09:57

At present the Domestic Rugby Season for Level 5 and Level 6 is 26 games and 22 Games for Level 7 and below. That is home and away that doesn't include the Cup game so the season can go up as high as 30 plus games.

We are into our second game and I have a list of 8 first team players out for one reason or another.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby sk 88 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 13:45

Working Class Rugger wrote:
sk 88 wrote:Why do all the solutions seem to revolve around having two half-competitions instead of one whole one?

Surely the lesson from European rugby (and every other domestic Australian sport) is that you need regular games for a whole season to generate enough cash and interest to run the game?

Why not aim for 30 games, i.e. pretty much a full season? (Like Europe internationals could be rested for a few rounds to avoid burnout).


They're not half competitions. They jare two distinct structures that serve two different purposes. The IPRC is the primary professional competition. It would run for up to 20 weeks.

The NRC is very much a talent I'd and development structure. Due to our geography and the fact that we have 5 distinct city based premier club competitions it is the best way to test out the best talent from the respective structures against current professionals to see whether they have what it takes.

As for the number of games. No one expects the players to play 40 games. That's nuts. I tend to believe 30 is pushing it. I tend to agree that such is the nature of the game that anything over 25 games a season is probably too much.


I think you can do both in one longer competition. The European leagues manage it. The NRL manages it. Aussie Rules manages it. Football manages it.

But my main point is about cash and generating it. Fandom is about loyalty and identity. Most people can handle national team and local club support. I don't see many people, in a practical money out of the pocket way, supporting two local teams even when they don't in theory compete. In practice they are competing for loyalty and dollars.

Working Class Rugger wrote:But that doesn't mean I don't love watching the game. I do. I watch as much as I can. This weekend I'll watch all four NRC games, the Aid/Are game as a definite and probably two Pro14 and AP games a piece. But in my opinion we need to player welfare into account. Because without the players we have nothing to watch.


Yes that was aimed at stro bro not at you. There has to be a balance but basically games generate funds and if we want professional leagues we need games to generate the revenue. They don't all have to be played by the same players.

Working Class Rugger wrote:
In the above structures players would be rotated, rested and not necessarily play in every game. Looking at your average pro who doesn't play internationals. If his team makes it through to the final of the IPRC he'll play a total of 18 games. He'll have about 6 weeks off between the end of the IPRC and the start of the NRC. After that he'll play a Max of 10 games in the NRC for a total of 28 games. Which would be about the average.

All this would be achieved without decreasing the overall content available. In fact it increases it.


This is what I'm getting at. By having two competitions-worth of teams you are dividing the fans loyalty over numerous teams whilst also increasing the number of behind the scenes people you need. For instance all those teams need people to run them, if it was the same teams (even if different competitions) then the costs are less as there is less duplication but the revenues are greater as there are more matches to sell and less teams for people to go to. That goes from burger flippers to team logistics managers.

Basically If you're going to have 30 matches a season you might as well have 1 club playing 30 matches rather than 2-sort of the same but not-clubs paying 15 each.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby sk 88 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 13:54

TheStroBro wrote:
sk 88 wrote:1) No one plays 40 games
2) No one is suggesting 40 games
3) Rugby needs to massively expand its professional matches to grow. You cannot be a professional team from 8 home games with 20k (max) in attendance.
4) the Suggested formats all have two competitions with a rough total of 30 games. I'm asking why not go for one comp with the same number instead.

To be totally frank i don't understand how you can claim to love rugby but not want to watch it. I'd easily watch 5 or more games each weekend across several leagues and would do that every weekend if possible. The summer without any matches drives me mental. I'd go every other weekend and sometimes mid week to a home game if I could.


Aviva, Top 14, Guinness roughly have 30 matches on their schedule right now before you get to the semi-finals of each and the European knockout rounds. Then you add to the fact that most T1s are playing 12 matches. Some of these guys put 35-40 matches on their rig. If you don't think that's a healthy problem, you must have played very sparingly. Rugby is not soccer, and it needs to stop acting like it. Perhaps actually sell out the matches, Ricoh was half full in week 1. Something you'd never see on the Grid-Iron here unless you're the Rams.

I personally have a life and do more than just watch Rugby. I play Rugby and I also race triathlon. And then add to the fact that I like Grid-Iron Football. So when it comes to a weekend after I've trained in the AM in the Autumn I'm pretty much in front of my tube with either a Rugby match or Football game on. And then add some foam rolling in.



None of those guys play every game. That's the point. Because people have loyalty to the one team people will go and watch (generate revenue, i.e. pay the bills of professional sport) no matter who is playing. That means you get development, you get player rest and you also have a model that is generating a shit load more money than Australia.

Remember the WHOLE PROBLEM is Australia doesn't generate the revenue that European sides do. That's why they decided to cut a team. That's the problem they have to solve. I'll never understand how "copy the successful model" is considered not only controversial but somehow morally wrong in rugby.

You can say rugby ain't soccer all you like but it isn't grid iron either. The game's had a season from September to May for a 100 years. Cutting games wou;dn't improve attendances it would just milk less cash from dedicated fans pockets.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby sk 88 » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 14:02

ihateblazers wrote:For me the European season drags on too much, around halfway through the season when the international fixtures come along (yes even if it's a lowish percentage of the players) the overall standards and top level quality drops. I don't bother watching club rugby from the six nations till the playoffs. The season just loses all its momentum. It would be so much better if the club season finished before the 6 nations or if there was a reduction in fixtures so that the cross over between the international periods doesn't disrput so much.

Not too mention the length of the season being too lobg for the players mentally and physically for optimum performance.


I understand what you're saying there but I think its far more to do with season structure than number of games or their quality. For instance in the last 12 weeks of the season 7 of them are knock out rounds. That means that each club is only guaranteed 2 home games in 3 months from March to May. Its hard to keep momentum going like that.

Personally I'd move the Euro quarter finals back to January and the semi finals to the current QF slot after the 6N. I'd also change the Anglo-Welsh Cup dates to spread out the knock out rounds more. Alternatively moving the 6N forward by a fortnight or so would also free more weeks at the end of the season to maintain momentum.

With the global calendar they're effectively doing that by moving the end of the season back but I'm still very skeptical it will actually happen.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby honestly_united » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 14:40

As much as I agree that you need to be playing a proper number of games if you want to generate income as a pro league, you also have to have a balance in terms of player welfare.

The Top14, Aviva and Pro14 clubs all have more financial clout than the Superugby teams and the only thing keeping players in the SH is the opportunity to play for their country. Yet in the NH all the clubs play more games than in the SH hence they have much more income, however on the flip side, the SH for the most part have much better international teams results wise, which potentially could be down to playing less games.

Saying that their is a big difference even between the NH, where the celtic countries the unions have control over the clubs, so ensure that the players are looked after, have maximum number of games etc. From watching Glasgow, you wont see players playing more than 3 games in a row etc. However in France (and to a lesser extent England) the clubs pay the players and they want there pound of flesh so want the best players on the pitch at all times, but they are getting much bigger gates than the other leagues so in a way are doing something right. But you just have to look at the performances of the French national team to see that maybe this isn't the best approach.

In Britain it is traditional that the rugby season starts first week of Sept and finishes end of April and weather permitting there is a game every weekend. It should be remembered though that about 30 years ago there was no league rugby in England and everyone just played friendlies albeit that is about 35 games a season, plus a summer tour somewhere which wasn't just test matches, there was also midweek and other representative games in between.

I know in the SH they have superugby then into the national tournaments, but its asking fans to follow more than one team, which probably doesnt help when trying to build a club and bring in income.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby victorsra » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 18:27

Interesting to think this as a development competition, or at least that is what looks like when scheduled to August-October.

My bet is that in the 2020s we'll have 4 major professional leagues in the world rugby with two models competing:

Open leagues, with relegation:
- Top 14
- Premiership

Closed leagues, with franchises:
- Asia-Pacific Super Rugby
- Atlantic PRO"X"

With this settled we'll see a competition for players that can have 3 different results: 1 equilibrium (I hope so), 2 the melting down of one of those models (either for financial unsustainabilty, tension with the Unions or players' welfare issues) or 3 the simples relegation of one region to a players' exporter condition (more or less what happened to South America in football from the 1990s).
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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby Working Class Rugger » Fri, 15 Sep 2017, 23:09

sk 88 wrote:
Working Class Rugger wrote:
sk 88 wrote:Why do all the solutions seem to revolve around having two half-competitions instead of one whole one?

Surely the lesson from European rugby (and every other domestic Australian sport) is that you need regular games for a whole season to generate enough cash and interest to run the game?

Why not aim for 30 games, i.e. pretty much a full season? (Like Europe internationals could be rested for a few rounds to avoid burnout).


They're not half competitions. They jare two distinct structures that serve two different purposes. The IPRC is the primary professional competition. It would run for up to 20 weeks.

The NRC is very much a talent I'd and development structure. Due to our geography and the fact that we have 5 distinct city based premier club competitions it is the best way to test out the best talent from the respective structures against current professionals to see whether they have what it takes.

As for the number of games. No one expects the players to play 40 games. That's nuts. I tend to believe 30 is pushing it. I tend to agree that such is the nature of the game that anything over 25 games a season is probably too much.


I think you can do both in one longer competition. The European leagues manage it. The NRL manages it. Aussie Rules manages it. Football manages it.

But my main point is about cash and generating it. Fandom is about loyalty and identity. Most people can handle national team and local club support. I don't see many people, in a practical money out of the pocket way, supporting two local teams even when they don't in theory compete. In practice they are competing for loyalty and dollars.

Working Class Rugger wrote:But that doesn't mean I don't love watching the game. I do. I watch as much as I can. This weekend I'll watch all four NRC games, the Aid/Are game as a definite and probably two Pro14 and AP games a piece. But in my opinion we need to player welfare into account. Because without the players we have nothing to watch.


Yes that was aimed at stro bro not at you. There has to be a balance but basically games generate funds and if we want professional leagues we need games to generate the revenue. They don't all have to be played by the same players.

Working Class Rugger wrote:
In the above structures players would be rotated, rested and not necessarily play in every game. Looking at your average pro who doesn't play internationals. If his team makes it through to the final of the IPRC he'll play a total of 18 games. He'll have about 6 weeks off between the end of the IPRC and the start of the NRC. After that he'll play a Max of 10 games in the NRC for a total of 28 games. Which would be about the average.

All this would be achieved without decreasing the overall content available. In fact it increases it.


This is what I'm getting at. By having two competitions-worth of teams you are dividing the fans loyalty over numerous teams whilst also increasing the number of behind the scenes people you need. For instance all those teams need people to run them, if it was the same teams (even if different competitions) then the costs are less as there is less duplication but the revenues are greater as there are more matches to sell and less teams for people to go to. That goes from burger flippers to team logistics managers.

Basically If you're going to have 30 matches a season you might as well have 1 club playing 30 matches rather than 2-sort of the same but not-clubs paying 15 each.



The NRL actually has three other competitions that underpin it. Well, actually four but two of them tend to be at the same level so we can class them as one. Beneath the NRL you have the U20s, the NSW and QLD state leagues and then below them in NSW a semi-professional structures.

Outside of the U20s these are all different clubs to that in the NRL. There are partnership arrangements but they run as completely independent concerns. The NRC is essentially the same concept but instead of running it during the same window as SR we run it separately in its own dedicated period. There's actually no overlap.

As for the number of games. I tend to side with the 'quality over quantity' argument. I'd rather see the current leagues play fewer overall games but of general high quality with player fitter and healthier than packing as many fixtures as possible into a calendar but with players at heightened levels of fatigue and lesser levels of performance. I get the perspective as a fan of wanting as much Rugby as possible to be available and that the professional game is the engine room behind the finances of the game. But, in this regard more isn't always best. For anyone.

If say we saw all the major leagues move to 16-18 week regular seasons with the goal to 1) ensure player welfare is primary and 2) due to this, allow for players to be able to perform at the physical peak more often. Then I'd dare say from a spectators perspective that would be more appealing. Which translates to more people watching on TV and thus more money into the game etc.

In Europe, it would also make integrating Euro structures easier. Fans would still get to see their team play between 20-24 games a season.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby thatrugbyguy » Sat, 16 Sep 2017, 01:51

I understand where sk 88 is coming from, what I think is getting lost however is the NRC is meant as a development league between the state based rugby competitions and Super Rugby. It's not trying to bill itself as being the premier rugby competition in the country. AFL, NRL, Soccer, as well as other sports have done essentially the same thing in various forms over the years. The formats essentially remain the same across all sports: Professional League -> Semi-Pro League -> State Based League.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby honestly_united » Mon, 18 Sep 2017, 09:17

When it comes to these threads on league structures etc, you can always tell where people are from based what system they propose for a league, and in fairness there are pro's and cons for most of them. The majority of people from western europe will propose leagues of 12/14 playing H&A, where as SH are more likely to go with much less, with development pathways between set ups.

In the NH traditionally it has always been straight nationwide top league, with many nation wide leagues underneath, before splitting in a pyramid below that - which was copied from the football leagues that had been running for close to a hundred years before rugby copied the system. I think the pyramid system works quite well in that ambitious clubs can start at the bottom as an amateur team, a group of friends want to play rugby, and over time build the facilities and the standard of play and work their way up to the top leagues. As an example, a club close to where I grew up playing in Scotland, Marr are this year in the Top tier of Scottish club rugby, which is semi professional in all but name. About 20 years ago they were probably about 5 or 6 leagues below that but have progressed over the last few years.

The SH, is very much based on clubs play in local leagues, the best players are then chosen to play for their region. This should mean that the best players are always playing in the best competition. I can see why this has happened as when the systems were formed (before British rugby leagues were put in place) the distances involved, especially in Australia and SA meant that playing national every week was not really feasible, so local competitions were set up, then a small number of representative games added.

Previously this would have benefitted SH national teams as the players are used to coming together under a representative banner and playing with players they maybe aren't used to. I think the issue now is that Super rugby added another layer ontop of that so fans have the added issue of who to support,

Club > Currie Cup / ITM Cup team > Super Rugby in SH or just Club Side in NH

except of course for the Pro14. Ireland have done the best out of it, but many of the Irish sports like hurling and gaelic football already had the club and county system, so the Irish fans were used to supporting thier county as well as their club so took to the provinces in the Pro14 and they get a good support. The issues in Wales are well documented, and Scotland has not been great either, especially in the borders with the Rievers, but Glasgow being a success is more down to chance and product on the park bring fans out, rather than anything else

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby kush123 » Wed, 04 Oct 2017, 13:48

The new six-team competition has been dubbed the IPL of rugby.

http://www.news.com.au/sport/rugby/matt ... #sharehash

It will be great for rugby if we can see an IPL type of an auction included tournament for 15's .If I'm not wrong Sri Lanka should be the first country to have an auction included tournament in rugby , named as Carlton 7s now it rebrand as super7s . It was a huge success for SL rugby , I'm sure this will put Oz rugby in the same financially powerful position as India in cricket if this happened.won't be surprised if we see even AB players picking IPC over country ;)

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby thatrugbyguy » Thu, 05 Oct 2017, 00:41

Locations are going to be interesting. It's clearly going to be set in a time zone that's favourable to Perth.

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby kush123 » Wed, 18 Oct 2017, 15:27

IPRC talks progressing: Pulver

ARU CEO Bill Pulver says discussions over Andrew Forrest's proposed Indo-Pacific Rugby Championship have been taken to the next level.

An ARU working group met with WA billionaire Andrew Forrest last week about his proposed IIPRC, and Pulver said talks had gone to World Rugby, though the concept is still in its fledgling stage.

“There's deep engagement,” he said.

“We have a working party chaired by our deputy chair and a variety of ARU executive involved.

“There's discussion at a world rugby level, so there's a very deep discussion going but frankly a lot of work to be done.”

Cameron Clyne chaired the meeting. Photo: Getty Images
Cameron Clyne appeared in Canberra on Monday night. Photo: Getty Images
“The outgoing ARU boss said he was looking forward to the end of an ongoing Senate inquiry into the sport, after a tumultuous year for Australian rugby.

Pulver appeared in the opening hearing of the inquiry last month, while chairman Cameron Clyne testified on Monday night in Canberra.

The Senators have questioned both men over conflicts of interest surrounding Pulver’s former deputy Rob Clarke as well as the timeframe under which the idea of cutting a team was first formulated.

The final report will be handed down on November 13.

"Frankly we're looking forward to the process coming to an end. It's been an extremely difficult process for all involved,” Pulver said.

“Eliminating a team from a Super Rugby competition was never going to be fun and never going to be consequence free.

“So, we are looking forward to the process being behind us and getting on with Super Rugby next year.”

Meanwhile, a big international decision looms for Australia next month, as World Rugby’s members vote on the 2023 Rugby World Cup host.

Ireland is one of three bidders, competing with France and South Africa for the tournament and while Ireland President said he was ‘optimistic’ of Australian support, pulver was more ambivalent.

“The Rugby World Cup is the third biggest sporting event on the planet so it has a very significant impact on whichever country is successful,” he said.

“I can tell you I had the great pleasure of being in Ireland a couple of months ago watching an incredibly successful women's Rugby World Cup.

“They did an outstanding job and two cracking games between the Australian women's team and the Irish women's team. I've also had the pleasure of seeing their bid and it is a superb quality bid.

“The reality is they're up against two pretty tough competitors, in France and South Africa.

“It'll be interesting to note the outcome later in November.”

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Re: Western Force potentially looking for an Asian League

Postby victorsra » Wed, 18 Oct 2017, 17:32

I don't understand what is the point to have a new competition in the same period of the NRC. Wouldn't it make much more sense to simply put money on the NRC and expand it to Asia?
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