Tier 2 & 3 Rugby Forum

Change in Residency Eligibility

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Re: Change in Residency Eligibility

Postby RugbyLiebe » Tue, 16 May 2017, 07:29

Suiram wrote:the cumulative residency thing could be quite interesting with situations where children lived in a certain country or went to school somewhere. In the past, people that moved on for work or study reset their residency clock, but there may be some corner cases especially places where parents might be spending years for work. And since its cumulative, that means if you spent 8 years as child in a country, you will only take 2 years to achieve full qualification on residency.


Very good and interesting point. I actually know a lot of this cases. I.e. one of my kids was born in Asia with an European passport and an African father. They live in Germany since he's about 8. If he went away for uni, he would have been never eligible to play for the country he was raised and played all of his rugby in.
On the downside, the introduction of this will complicate things a lot. How do you actually prove it?
How to grow rugby worldwide?
Look at the world ranking in July. Teams ranked 1-10 have to play one team from 11-20 (they don't play in a regular competition) away the next year. 11-20 play 21-30 away and so on. Yes, it really is that simple.

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Re: Change in Residency Eligibility

Postby honestly_united » Tue, 16 May 2017, 12:00

RugbyLiebe wrote:
honestly_united wrote:I wonder how much this will impact the Tier 3 and below countries?
Just asking as I noticed by coincidence today (reading the Nacra thread), that a lad I played with many years ago (nearly 20) was recalled to Bermuda squad for last weekends game. He will have qualified through residency many years ago having moved their for work in his mid 20's. Will the rule changes impact this situation where someone who is a good amateur player who moves to another country for work, wants to still play rugby in his new country, and finds himself as one of the top players in his adopted country?

Most players in this situation will then be getting close to "over the hill" after 5 years, and may decide not to represent their adopted country as they may think they are holding back a native player, whereas after 3 they may still feel they have something to give and contribute to their new home.


We definitely see less of this players. Just a matter of math and as you stated age. Who studies i.e. for 5 years? Within 3 year a lot of uni students become eligible - probably a really important source for lower t3 countries...


This was more had studied in the UK, then worked in the UK for a few years before deciding to move to another country, then being qualified under residency. Its a bit different qualifying at 28 to say 30.

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Re: Change in Residency Eligibility

Postby RugbyLiebe » Tue, 16 May 2017, 12:51

honestly_united wrote:This was more had studied in the UK, then worked in the UK for a few years before deciding to move to another country, then being qualified under residency. Its a bit different qualifying at 28 to say 30.


Yeah? While there might be some or actually a lot of cases who studied in the UK, then came back to their home-country and then played for it. Your example seems a little too far-fetched to be usual. There are probably some cases, but it is still very unlikely.
I think about a player I know who now plays for the country he studied in after residing there for three years.
How to grow rugby worldwide?
Look at the world ranking in July. Teams ranked 1-10 have to play one team from 11-20 (they don't play in a regular competition) away the next year. 11-20 play 21-30 away and so on. Yes, it really is that simple.

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Re: Change in Residency Eligibility

Postby honestly_united » Tue, 16 May 2017, 16:41

RugbyLiebe wrote:
honestly_united wrote:This was more had studied in the UK, then worked in the UK for a few years before deciding to move to another country, then being qualified under residency. Its a bit different qualifying at 28 to say 30.


Yeah? While there might be some or actually a lot of cases who studied in the UK, then came back to their home-country and then played for it. Your example seems a little too far-fetched to be usual. There are probably some cases, but it is still very unlikely.
I think about a player I know who now plays for the country he studied in after residing there for three years.


I would think there must be quite a few people from the UK, NZ, Aus, SA etc who have moved to another country through work, have played rugby for a club, then after the residency period played internationals.
I suppose on the one hand you probably have the situation in Hong Kong for example (gulf is another example) where the team is majority expats and obviously the change may help the locals get more chances, to the situation where there is maybe one of two who are helping to raise the standard of the locals.

Im not sure how much of an issue it is, just new of a case and wondered if there would be an effect going forward.

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