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South American rugby

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Re: South American rugby

Postby Tobar » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 14:40

Armchair Fan wrote:I don't think the guys Argentina will try to put into LSR will be those aiming at Top 14 or Pro D2 but those currently considering going to Italy or Spain or interested in following a Sevens career path. It's clearly one step below that.


There will always be players who want to go to Spain or other places to play club rugby so that they can live in those countries but if LSR takes off and can pay the players then there will come a point where that is much more desirable.

At the end of the day, my biggest hope is that LSR can help create a rugby culture in all of South America and not just Argentina. This way in 10, 20 or 30 years down the road there will be an interconnected relationship between all the countries and this will help not only the professional setup but the amateur as well. There will be more opportunities to play against local competition and a competition like the Sudamerica 6 Naciones could take off and become something like the Copa America (or like the regular 6 Nations). A rising tide lifts all ships.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby Armchair Fan » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 14:53

To be honest, creating a rugby culture takes more than a professional league. Finding the league between professional and amateur development is tricky. NFL could teach us a few lessons about it considering it funded NFL Europe for over a decade. Even if you create a fanbase that doesn't mean it will create a culture, or that it will push people to try the sport, or that they will see it as playable rather than something only entertaining on TV or from the grandstands. We should keep goals low.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby 4N » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 15:17

NFLEL was successful in Germany. The NFL just decided to shift their resources to playing games in London with the view of putting a team there eventually. But this is a pet project of the unpopular commissioner and seems to be on hold now with the preferred alternative being a slate of “neutral site” games every year.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby Armchair Fan » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 15:47

Succesful judging by which criteria? Yes, it created a fanbase even if small. Yes, some German players have made it to the NFL. But did it create a football culture in Germany? Not so much.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby 4N » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 16:05

What did you expect them to do? Launch a fully pro German league? It was successful in the stands. Most people thought if they had concentrated more teams in Germany from the start, it would have fared better. I remember the crowds in Barcelona being pretty poor, that obviously wasn’t a good venue though the players enjoyed it.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 16:29

Raven wrote:
victorsra wrote:Feb-June = Jaguares + LSR 1 and LSR 2
July = Pumas + Pumitas (if the U20s Championship moves to July)
Aug-Oct = Pumas + Pampas + ArgXV
Nov = Pumas

We are always talking about 3 squads.


So you think the Jaguares (who are the Pumas, and likely to become in a big percentage the Pampas) will be able to play 11 months with hardly any breaks? They are profesional rugby players not machines you can turn on and off..! :)

It´s 4 squads, not 3. Or even if I say OK,everybody thinks otherwise, I might be wrong, they would have to be 1 + 2 VERY large and robust rosters, where depth is the main question, bringing me back to what I mentioned before.

2 good teams, yeah, doable, 3, hard but perhaps with a wealthy budget, 4 pretty difficult....


Dude, pay atention: Jaguares/Pumas calendar wont change! It is exactly the calendar they play today: Super Rugby from Late Feb to June (16 to 19 matches) + TRC (6 matches) + Tests (July and Nov, 6 matches). I dont know if you know but this is the calendar of every single All Blacks, Springboks, Wallabies players too.

What changes is the calendar for other Argentine teams.

It is 3 squads if Pampas and ArgXV are made of LSR players (from the 2 Argentina LSR franchises). But those teams might involve other Argies playing in Brazil/Uruguay/Chile/Paraguay LSR franchises and Pumitas players from amateur clubs. Those players will have about
Last edited by victorsra on Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 16:41, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby Armchair Fan » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 16:31

4N wrote:What did you expect them to do? Launch a fully pro German league? It was successful in the stands. Most people thought if they had concentrated more teams in Germany from the start, it would have fared better. I remember the crowds in Barcelona being pretty poor, that obviously wasn’t a good venue though the players enjoyed it.

I didn't expect anything, I wasn't even an adult by the time I watched some Dragons highlights on TV, I'm just saying I'm skeptical regarding the effect of LAR in South American rugby culture mentioned by Tobar.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 16:48

victorsra wrote:
Raven wrote:
victorsra wrote:Feb-June = Jaguares + LSR 1 and LSR 2
July = Pumas + Pumitas (if the U20s Championship moves to July)
Aug-Oct = Pumas + Pampas + ArgXV
Nov = Pumas

We are always talking about 3 squads.


So you think the Jaguares (who are the Pumas, and likely to become in a big percentage the Pampas) will be able to play 11 months with hardly any breaks? They are profesional rugby players not machines you can turn on and off..! :)

It´s 4 squads, not 3. Or even if I say OK,everybody thinks otherwise, I might be wrong, they would have to be 1 + 2 VERY large and robust rosters, where depth is the main question, bringing me back to what I mentioned before.

2 good teams, yeah, doable, 3, hard but perhaps with a wealthy budget, 4 pretty difficult....


Dude, pay atention: Jaguares/Pumas calendar wont change! It is exactly the calendar they play today: Super Rugby from Late Feb to June (16 to 19 matches) + TRC (6 matches) + Tests (July and Nov, 6 matches). I dont know if you know but this is the calendar of every single All Blacks, Springboks, Wallabies players too.

What changes is the calendar for other Argentine teams.

It is 3 squads if Pampas and ArgXV are made of LSR players (from the 2 Argentina LSR franchises). But those teams might involve other Argies playing in Brazil/Uruguay/Chile/Paraguay LSR franchises and Pumitas players from amateur clubs. Those players will have about


We are talking about 90-100 professional players in Argentina below the Jaguares/Pumas squad. Those new players would have between about 15 (LSR + ARC) and 20/22 (LSR + Currie Cup) matches/year (the amount of matches of a regular European player).

The question is not the number of matches. It is inside the current pattern and even a little bit below. The question is where the hell Argentina will find the money for that? And will Argentine rugby people embrace all this as consumers? (as for Argentine rugbymen what matters the most are their amateur clubs....).

However if you ask me how many matches a pro player should play I would say much much much less then what we have today. European leagues are fucking players Welfare policies. It is World Rugby's new calendar that has freking lunatic 11 months!

But this is another discussion. What Argentina is doing is pretty much what everybody in pro rugby does. And with less months than in Europe. European clubs will have 11 months calendars, but Southern Hemisphere will keep a 9 months and a half calendar. Argentina's new calendar will have exactly 9-10 months.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby Tobar » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 17:23

Armchair Fan wrote:
4N wrote:What did you expect them to do? Launch a fully pro German league? It was successful in the stands. Most people thought if they had concentrated more teams in Germany from the start, it would have fared better. I remember the crowds in Barcelona being pretty poor, that obviously wasn’t a good venue though the players enjoyed it.

I didn't expect anything, I wasn't even an adult by the time I watched some Dragons highlights on TV, I'm just saying I'm skeptical regarding the effect of LAR in South American rugby culture mentioned by Tobar.


Yeah, I don't expect a rugby culture to pop up like that I just mean that this will help grow rugby in these countries as long as it's mildly successful. So if LAR is successful (decent attendance, profitable enough) then that will naturally help create more rugby fans and players. I also use the term "culture" loosely. I really mean create more awareness of the sport which results in fast improvement. I also said this would be over a period of 10-30 years so it's not an overnight thing.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby 4N » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 17:41

If the team in Asuncion were successful for example, a fanbase and “culture” would develop a lot quicker than a decade+. But let’s wait and see what the aim of this league is. They could just be aiming to play at amateur club venues and cater to the existing rugby community. Look at the different approaches of Chile (smaller venue, higher ticket prices) vs Brazil in hosting the Maori All Blacks. One will attract new fans, the other will try to squeeze more money from the affluent rugby community.

The bigger problem for some of the T2/3 countries will be getting players up to speed with Argentina in what is a very technical game, but maybe key imports at positions like prop, back row and flyhalf can provide a quick fix.

The Argentine teams should do well as long as they stick to traditional provinces and colors rather than trying to reinvent the wheel. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Seattle Seawolves did so well in MLR with their typical Seattle branding and colors. The Montevideo teams will benefit from this with Penarol and Nacional’s branding.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Thu, 23 Aug 2018, 18:03

Not sure how many new fans we'll capture. The stadium has an awful location and the prices are too high. We'll have a bigger attendance because we have more people, but I am not that sure about "new" people. I hope we can reach this new public. What makes the difference is not the stadium (btw, Universidad Catolica's stadium is in a perfect location for Santiago) but who is promoting it: in Brazil's case Bradesco, a huge bank. It is Bradesco support and not the unloved Morumbi stadium the difference.

BTW, why not Pacaembu stadium? Pacaembu is a public stadium that is now passing a privatization process, that was blocked by the justice last week. Things are a bit messy now and CBRu decided to approach another stadium.

Furthermore, there is a big difference between Brazilian and Chilean rugby cultures. Chile has a long tradition and rugby there is known by everybody and is deemed as an upper class sport (working class knows rugby and either doesnt like it or sees it with indiference... I guess it is the same for most of the middle class without rugby ties). In Brazil it is a cool "new" sport (even if not exactly new here), with a general good image (but still poorly known by most people).
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Re: South American rugby

Postby Raven » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 09:49

victorsra wrote:
victorsra wrote:
Raven wrote:
victorsra wrote:Feb-June = Jaguares + LSR 1 and LSR 2
July = Pumas + Pumitas (if the U20s Championship moves to July)
Aug-Oct = Pumas + Pampas + ArgXV
Nov = Pumas

We are always talking about 3 squads.


So you think the Jaguares (who are the Pumas, and likely to become in a big percentage the Pampas) will be able to play 11 months with hardly any breaks? They are professional rugby players not machines you can turn on and off..! :)

It´s 4 squads, not 3. Or even if I say OK,everybody thinks otherwise, I might be wrong, they would have to be 1 + 2 VERY large and robust rosters, where depth is the main question, bringing me back to what I mentioned before.

2 good teams, yeah, doable, 3, hard but perhaps with a wealthy budget, 4 pretty difficult....


Dude, pay atention: Jaguares/Pumas calendar wont change! It is exactly the calendar they play today: Super Rugby from Late Feb to June (16 to 19 matches) + TRC (6 matches) + Tests (July and Nov, 6 matches). I dont know if you know but this is the calendar of every single All Blacks, Springboks, Wallabies players too.

What changes is the calendar for other Argentine teams.

It is 3 squads if Pampas and ArgXV are made of LSR players (from the 2 Argentina LSR franchises). But those teams might involve other Argies playing in Brazil/Uruguay/Chile/Paraguay LSR franchises and Pumitas players from amateur clubs. Those players will have about


We are talking about 90-100 professional players in Argentina below the Jaguares/Pumas squad. Those new players would have between about 15 (LSR + ARC) and 20/22 (LSR + Currie Cup) matches/year (the amount of matches of a regular European player).

The question is not the number of matches. It is inside the current pattern and even a little bit below. The question is where the hell Argentina will find the money for that? And will Argentine rugby people embrace all this as consumers? (as for Argentine rugbymen what matters the most are their amateur clubs....).

However if you ask me how many matches a pro player should play I would say much much much less then what we have today. European leagues are fucking players Welfare policies. It is World Rugby's new calendar that has freking lunatic 11 months!

But this is another discussion. What Argentina is doing is pretty much what everybody in pro rugby does. And with less months than in Europe. European clubs will have 11 months calendars, but Southern Hemisphere will keep a 9 months and a half calendar. Argentina's new calendar will have exactly 9-10 months.


Nah mate, don´t get me wrong, I understand what you mean, but I said it before, we can see things differently and don´t have to agree on everything. At the end of the day we are only discussing something out of nothing cause neither the Pampas are in the Currie Cup as of yet, nor the LAR teams/squads have been properly announced, and have no certainty (AFAIK) of the ARC official change of calendar. So hold your horses there.

Just for the sake of argument, what you state is (in a nutshell) that Jaguares and Pumas will be one "squad"; and under that out of mainly the 2 LAR franchises you´ll have ArgXV for the ARC and the "Pampas" for the Currie Cup, while the best Arg. players are playing at The Rugby Championship, "just" 3 teams playing at the same time, I get it. But what I am saying (and quite sure of it) is that, 3 rosters won´t be enough, even if they get a handful of players from the other LAR franchises - we don´t even know if there´s going to be Argies spread throughout them! They will need a 4th squad (say ca.30+ players) to enable resting / recovering from small injuries or medium-long-term injuries / retirements / players that might leave from LAR to Europe, etc. You even mention adding some Pumitas in the mix, that could be you 4th "breather" roster, feeding LAR squads and some guys being brought to the Currie Cup after their U20 WR tournament, but for that, they would need to get FULL PRO contracts... cause they cannot be amateur and expected to train as a pro, take that much time to travel, etc....

Jaguares has today 42/44 players in their roster including the extended Training Group and Short term contracted players. Some of them don´t play enough or at all due to level / other reasons we can only assume; some (a handful) have been injured for relatively long periods of time too. Not all of the Jaguares are / will be Pumas, so it´s likely that we see some Jaguares playing for the "Pampas" in the Currie Cup. But they won´t be able to shorten the extended squad during the SR season to play in the LAR, nor do I think that Quesada will want to lend a player for potential long trip to Paraguay or Brazil to then fly over to NZ or AUS, as they have done before with SR unused players and ARC.
Furthermore, both ARC and Currie Cup will demand lot of travelling and although they don´t seem to be very long seasons they are indeed very demanding, and will have a direct impact in the competitiveness Argentina can bring, specially if their intention is to field a Development team (mix of 2nd and 3rd string players) in either ARC or Currie Cup.

One thing I do agree full with you is, don´t know where money is going to come from (in spite of the 50% WR aid + a 49% private owner of LAR franchises) and I think is going to take time for people to back a franchise just because. Amateur club spirit and philosophy are in most cases even more important than the Jaguares already.

A reason why in Europe the season is longer can be due to distances, travels are shorter, so although games are as hard, they aren´t worn out by intercontinental flights... That being said, with the Cheetahs and Southern Kings in Pro14 that argument has gone to sh*ts.

Hope I made myself a bit more clear now, as it doesn´t make sense to try and "convince" the other person. I am only sharing my opinion. We´ll have to wait and see what happens, hell, for all I know, maybe they decide that ALL the LAR franchises can feed the "Pampas" in the Currie Cup (unlikely that they open the doors in the Jaguares, for now at least) and then there´s gonna be a lot more players to pick from, regardless of their nationality! would certainly help the region and you´ll have a lot more people backing the team.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby RugbyLiebe » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 11:33

Raven wrote:You being German probably heard of Alan Kessen, Alan played for Argentina U20s, was left out of the system at a certain age (due to a few factors that are irrelevant now), he then explored the chance to play for Germany, was picked for the XVs side (twice if I recall correctly) played 7s for Germany (in Melrose), was then offered a contract in Germany to become a full time rugby player and passed, why? because he wanted to continue with his job!, is he good enough to play at T2 International level, hell yeah!, franchise? of course!, does he want to, nope. There are tons of those.


I remember him, but I have no idea why he was left out of the system in Argentina. If I recall that right, he had just finished his studies and used the game for the German national team more or less as a sabbatical. Actually I see somebody like him as the perfect example, why more pro-places create a higher level. Maybe he would have taken his rugby opportunity more serious and would have continued in a higher environment than simply closing all amibtions by playing a couple of games for Germany at 24. Players like him are exactly what Argentina is losing atm. According to http://www.itsrugby.co.uk/player-17424.html he is still playing rugby btw., just seems to be happy with the amateur setup.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby thatrugbyguy » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 13:16

victorsra wrote:Not sure how many new fans we'll capture. The stadium has an awful location and the prices are too high. We'll have a bigger attendance because we have more people, but I am not that sure about "new" people. I hope we can reach this new public. What makes the difference is not the stadium (btw, Universidad Catolica's stadium is in a perfect location for Santiago) but who is promoting it: in Brazil's case Bradesco, a huge bank. It is Bradesco support and not the unloved Morumbi stadium the difference.

BTW, why not Pacaembu stadium? Pacaembu is a public stadium that is now passing a privatization process, that was blocked by the justice last week. Things are a bit messy now and CBRu decided to approach another stadium.

Furthermore, there is a big difference between Brazilian and Chilean rugby cultures. Chile has a long tradition and rugby there is known by everybody and is deemed as an upper class sport (working class knows rugby and either doesnt like it or sees it with indiference... I guess it is the same for most of the middle class without rugby ties). In Brazil it is a cool "new" sport (even if not exactly new here), with a general good image (but still poorly known by most people).


You've got to start somewhere though. What's going to be as important is what the Brazil RU do on the day to capitalise on the NZ Maori being there. Trying to attract juniors should be the biggest priority IMO. Get as many kids into the stadium as possible and get them exposed to the game, hand out flyers about the rules and values of the sports, and where their nearest clubs might be, stuff like that. NZ Maori if they were allowed to be ranked could easily best a top 5 international team, so it's possibly the most important event to happen to the sport in Brazil. Hopefully a big crowd will turn up.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 14:54

Yes, agree with you, it is the most important event (not counting the Olympics, that is difficult to rank).

Not sure about the kids. They always invite a couple of social projects, but the tickets were never that expensive . Let's wait. This match will break the attendance record for sure and Morumbi needs at least 30.000 people to have a good atmosphere, as the field is too far from the stands (very poor view). We don't have cricket (well, we do, but as tiny as possible) here but Morumbi feels like one cricket stadium.

At the end of the day we are only discussing something out of nothing cause neither the Pampas are in the Currie Cup as of yet, nor the LAR teams/squads have been properly announced, and have no certainty (AFAIK) of the ARC official change of calendar. So hold your horses there.


The change of the ARC in the calendar will happen. I interviewed the Brazilian Rugby Union CEO that made it clear... after that one of the Americas posters confirmed from a North American source...

I understand what you mean but for me the first question is still money: what will they do to keep all this going on?

About the Currie Cup, we read 2019. Ok, there isn't LAR in 2019. But does UAR want Currie Cup for 2020 or the 2019 idea is just a transition? I coudn't get it.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby dwpeate » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 15:14

Is there still a game between Brazil and Uruguay happening on Wednesday?

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 15:16

Yes. Thursday. Brazil vs Uruguay XV. Not a real match. It will be in the Brazilian Rugby Union training centre.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby carbonero » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 18:02

RugbyLiebe wrote:
Raven wrote:You being German probably heard of Alan Kessen, Alan played for Argentina U20s, was left out of the system at a certain age (due to a few factors that are irrelevant now), he then explored the chance to play for Germany, was picked for the XVs side (twice if I recall correctly) played 7s for Germany (in Melrose), was then offered a contract in Germany to become a full time rugby player and passed, why? because he wanted to continue with his job!, is he good enough to play at T2 International level, hell yeah!, franchise? of course!, does he want to, nope. There are tons of those.


I remember him, but I have no idea why he was left out of the system in Argentina. If I recall that right, he had just finished his studies and used the game for the German national team more or less as a sabbatical. Actually I see somebody like him as the perfect example, why more pro-places create a higher level. Maybe he would have taken his rugby opportunity more serious and would have continued in a higher environment than simply closing all amibtions by playing a couple of games for Germany at 24. Players like him are exactly what Argentina is losing atm. According to http://www.itsrugby.co.uk/player-17424.html he is still playing rugby btw., just seems to be happy with the amateur setup.

He was the captain of Pumitas in 2010 but he was never part of the UAR setup. There wasn't much of a system at the time though.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby dwpeate » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 18:58

victorsra wrote:Yes. Thursday. Brazil vs Uruguay XV. Not a real match. It will be in the Brazilian Rugby Union training centre.

Ah okay. Is Brazil playing an A team or just Uruguay?

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Re: South American rugby

Postby Tobar » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 19:20

The ARCh is confirmed to be streamed on Colombia Rugby’s YouTube channel (social media is @fecorugby).

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 19:21

Uruguay A

Brazil I am waiting the players list to know. But it is not a Ranking match.
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Re: South American rugby

Postby Hernan14 » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 20:44

RugbyLiebe wrote:
Raven wrote:You being German probably heard of Alan Kessen, Alan played for Argentina U20s, was left out of the system at a certain age (due to a few factors that are irrelevant now), he then explored the chance to play for Germany, was picked for the XVs side (twice if I recall correctly) played 7s for Germany (in Melrose), was then offered a contract in Germany to become a full time rugby player and passed, why? because he wanted to continue with his job!, is he good enough to play at T2 International level, hell yeah!, franchise? of course!, does he want to, nope. There are tons of those.


I remember him, but I have no idea why he was left out of the system in Argentina. If I recall that right, he had just finished his studies and used the game for the German national team more or less as a sabbatical. Actually I see somebody like him as the perfect example, why more pro-places create a higher level. Maybe he would have taken his rugby opportunity more serious and would have continued in a higher environment than simply closing all amibtions by playing a couple of games for Germany at 24. Players like him are exactly what Argentina is losing atm. According to http://www.itsrugby.co.uk/player-17424.html he is still playing rugby btw., just seems to be happy with the amateur setup.


I'm sorry, but his comments imply a lot of fantasy like that of "would have continued in a higher environment", in fact he talked about the gigantic level distance between the SIC and playing for Germany (obviously in favor of the SIC)...to put it in perspective of how Kessen came to play in Germany:

Kessen's parents went to live in Germany, her mother meets another argentine lady in a painting class, talking about her family, she tells that her son plays rugby in Argentina, the lady tells that her nephew (Tomas Van Gelderen) knows the head coach of the Germany, they ask if he has a German passport and then they ask for his mail.

The head coach writes to Kessen asking for some videos and summons him to the National Team, then Kessen requested vacations in his work to go to play to the German NT. Let it be clear that the work here paid him much better than he was going to charge for having a professional contract in Germany.

That him has been U20 doesn't mean absolutely nothing, the argentines here know that good contacts or so simple to carry a surname of the rugby world can make you possessor of a cap in the youth teams. The same goes for Argentina XV, it really is not even by far the second best team in Argentina, even players who don't pass the cut for the U20 play there.

For example, a good player who is 27 years old maybe with a "selectable" level, never will be, if he didn't go through any of the minor teams, except for certain more "aged" field positions obviously. In Argentina the selected one arrives by a direct path through steps ... to you have an idea, the team of my regional Union, Mar del Plata, perhaps the 10th most powerful, the 10th with luck, a couple of years ago won in Santiago against Chile easily (38-6 or something like that) ...some of the players play in the second division of my Union!! A union with only 17 teams.

Really, believe that a good regional/provincial team as Tucumán, trained for a year, can lose with Argentina XV? I give you the answer, no. The difference is that in Tucumán the best would play, in Argentina XV, in contrast, only play those who may in the future be part of the Pumas and some times not even those players, but the ones available at that moment with the best contacts.

I agree with 4N that if they want something of success, they should link the teams to the already existed regional/provincial teams, given that the argentine is not very inclined to follow sports teams "invented" from nothing.

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Re: South American rugby

Postby Armchair Fan » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 20:55

So... Mendoza+San Juan in San Juan and Córdoba? Or these two provincial teams would be too close to each other even in a country as big as Argentina?

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Re: South American rugby

Postby victorsra » Fri, 24 Aug 2018, 22:30

I believe the two more meaningful provincial sides would be Córdoba Dogos and Tucumán Naranjas.

I woudn't be surprised if UAR come up with the idea of following Uruguay's steps and link its franchises to football clubs, like Boca Juniors and River Plate. But I believe those clubs are too complicated to work with and rugby people in Argentina would hate the idea. I woudn't like this either, but I think the guys behind the league like this. In Brazil one of the proposals is to try to sell those franchises to football clubs (and Brazilian rugby people, including myself, would hate the idea... but if there is money and sponsors behind it might happen).
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Re: South American rugby

Postby thatrugbyguy » Sat, 25 Aug 2018, 03:20

victorsra wrote:Yes, agree with you, it is the most important event (not counting the Olympics, that is difficult to rank).

Not sure about the kids. They always invite a couple of social projects, but the tickets were never that expensive . Let's wait. This match will break the attendance record for sure and Morumbi needs at least 30.000 people to have a good atmosphere, as the field is too far from the stands (very poor view). We don't have cricket (well, we do, but as tiny as possible) here but Morumbi feels like one cricket stadium.


I can tell from personal experience rugby or soccer on an oval shaped/cricket field is not the best way to watch the game. You can still watch it but the distance from the pitch makes it feel less immersive. I wouldn't call it a terrible experience though, you're better off being seated in the upper levels. But yeah, whatever happens getting kids interested is the key to the future, so IMO if I was in charge of the Brazil RU my goal would be A) get the NZ players as much media exposure as possible and B) get as many kids to the game as possible, maybe try and find some wealthy benefactor to donate some funds to get the kids in. That said, if cricket ever catches on in Brazil at least there's a stadium ready to play in!

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