Tier 2 & 3 Rugby Forum

Favourite Books

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Tue, 03 Feb 2015, 23:39

So tough to narrow it down, but I'll start with my top 20 novels

:geek:

1 Uncle Tom's Cabin - Harriet Beacher Stowe
2 To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee
3 East of Eden - John Steinbeck
4 Crime & Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
5 David Copperfield - Charles Dickens
6 Les Miserables - Victor Hugo
7 Don Quixote - Miguel Cervantes
8 Wild Swans - Jung Chang
9 Sound and the Fury - William Faulkner
10 For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
11 The God of Small Things - Arundhati Roy
12 In Dubious Battle - John Steinbeck
13 Catcher in the Rye - J D Salinger
14 Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
15 Germinal - Emile Zola
16 To A God Unknown - John Steinbeck
17 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
18 The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway
19 Memed my Hawk - Yasar Kemal
20 Roots - Alex Hayley
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Wed, 04 Feb 2015, 00:18

Non-fiction (these are just some of the best I can remember):

:geek:

1 Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond
2 The People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
3 The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine - Ilan Pappe
4 Gaza in Crisis - Noam Chomsky
5 The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer
6 India - John Keay
7 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Dee Brown
8 Peter Bellwood - Man's Conquest of the Pacific
9 The Great War for Civilisation - Robert Fisk
10 Heroes - John Pilger
11 A Modern History of the Kurds - David McDowal
12 Hegemony of Survival - Noam Chomsky
13 In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
14 Rogue State - William Blum
15 The Blood Never Dried - John Newsinger
16 Britain's Gulag - Caroline Elkins
17 Ottoman Centuries - Lord Kinross
18 Blood of Brothers - Stephen Kinzer
19 The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond
20 Paradise Lost - Giles Milton
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Wed, 04 Feb 2015, 15:52

Another non-fiction classic was Hemingway's history of bullfighting, Death in the Afternoon. Really interesting. I'd have included that ahead of Giles Milton's account of the burning of Izmir at the end of WWI, if I'd thought of it. I read Paradise Lost just last summer, while in the Greek Islands, so it wast still fresh in my memory. Precopius' Byzantine Histories, which I read on line several years ago, are also fascinating. Muhammad Ali's autobiography was an interesting read, while the best autobiography about Turkey Ive read was Irfan Orga's Portrait of a Turkish Family.

As for novels, other favourites that have occurred to me since posting are Maxim Gorky's My Childhood, Alexandre Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo, Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun, & Alan Paton's Cry, the Beloved Country. The anti-war trio, Red Badge of Courage, Slaughterhouse Five & Catch 22 are also great reads, along with the German classic All Quiet on the Western Front. Of course, I could include many other classics by authors I've already mentioned, notably Dickens, Steinbeck, Heminway and Dostoyevsky . . .
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Sat, 28 Feb 2015, 19:46

19 Memed my Hawk - Yasar Kemal


RIP Yasar Kemal. Passed away today at age 91.

Here's Peter Ustanov's low budget but comical adaptation of Memed my Hawk:

If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 329
Joined: Wed, 18 Jun 2014, 08:34
National Flag:
New ZealandNew Zealand

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Natal » Sat, 14 Mar 2015, 01:15

Rowan wrote:Non-fiction (these are just some of the best I can remember):

:geek:

1 Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond
2 The People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
3 The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine - Ilan Pappe
4 Gaza in Crisis - Noam Chomsky
5 The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer
6 India - John Keay
7 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Dee Brown
8 Peter Bellwood - Man's Conquest of the Pacific
9 The Great War for Civilisation - Robert Fisk
10 Heroes - John Pilger
11 A Modern History of the Kurds - David McDowal
12 Hegemony of Survival - Noam Chomsky
13 In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
14 Rogue State - William Blum
15 The Blood Never Dried - John Newsinger
16 Britain's Gulag - Caroline Elkins
17 Ottoman Centuries - Lord Kinross
18 Blood of Brothers - Stephen Kinzer
19 The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond
20 Paradise Lost - Giles Milton


?

User avatar
Posts: 1838
Joined: Thu, 08 May 2014, 11:00
National Flag:
Faroe IslandsFaroe Islands

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Ser Podrick of Payne » Sat, 14 Mar 2015, 11:28

Natal wrote:
Rowan wrote:Non-fiction (these are just some of the best I can remember):

:geek:

1 Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond
2 The People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
3 The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine - Ilan Pappe
4 Gaza in Crisis - Noam Chomsky
5 The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer
6 India - John Keay
7 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Dee Brown
8 Peter Bellwood - Man's Conquest of the Pacific
9 The Great War for Civilisation - Robert Fisk
10 Heroes - John Pilger
11 A Modern History of the Kurds - David McDowal
12 Hegemony of Survival - Noam Chomsky
13 In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
14 Rogue State - William Blum
15 The Blood Never Dried - John Newsinger
16 Britain's Gulag - Caroline Elkins
17 Ottoman Centuries - Lord Kinross
18 Blood of Brothers - Stephen Kinzer
19 The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond
20 Paradise Lost - Giles Milton


?

Looks like one of those "what people claim are their favourites" when what they really read is

1. Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone
2. Bridget Jones Diary
3. The Pillars of the Earth
4. The Hunt for Red October
5. The Hunger Games
6. Fifty Shades Of Grey
7. Gone Girl
8. The Colour of Magic
9. Twilight
10. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

:D

And yes I have read some of these 10 ;)

Seriously, Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano series are all that anyone should need to read.

All you need to know is

"Il prossimo sdilluvio universale pinsò non sarà fatto d'acqua, ma di tutti i nostri rifiuti accumulati nei secoli. Moriremo assuffucati dalla nostra stissa merda." :thumbup:

Worst book ever, buy it for the funny it's so bad: The World's Friendliest People
Last edited by Ser Podrick of Payne on Mon, 08 Feb 2016, 19:34, edited 2 times in total.

Posts: 1265
Joined: Wed, 16 Apr 2014, 22:26
National Flag:
CanadaCanada

Re: Favourite Books

Postby grande » Sat, 14 Mar 2015, 13:45

Sure, Hitchhikers Guide isn't high literature, but I really enjoyed it. It's a fun read that didn't take itself too seriously.

The sequels on the other hand...

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Sun, 15 Mar 2015, 20:53

Ser Podrick of Payne wrote:
Natal wrote:
Rowan wrote:Non-fiction (these are just some of the best I can remember):

:geek:

1 Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond
2 The People's History of the United States - Howard Zinn
3 The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine - Ilan Pappe
4 Gaza in Crisis - Noam Chomsky
5 The Iliad and the Odyssey - Homer
6 India - John Keay
7 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Dee Brown
8 Peter Bellwood - Man's Conquest of the Pacific
9 The Great War for Civilisation - Robert Fisk
10 Heroes - John Pilger
11 A Modern History of the Kurds - David McDowal
12 Hegemony of Survival - Noam Chomsky
13 In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
14 Rogue State - William Blum
15 The Blood Never Dried - John Newsinger
16 Britain's Gulag - Caroline Elkins
17 Ottoman Centuries - Lord Kinross
18 Blood of Brothers - Stephen Kinzer
19 The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond
20 Paradise Lost - Giles Milton


?

Looks like one of those "what people claim are their favourites" when what they really read is

1. Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone
2. Bridget Jones Diary
3. The Pillars of the Earth
4. The Hunt for Red October
5. The Hunger Games
6. Fifty Shades Of Grey
7. Gone Girl
8. The Colour of Magic
9. Twilight
10. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

:D

And yes I have read some of these 10 ;)

Seriously, Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano series are all that anyone should need to read.

All you need to know is

"Il prossimo sdilluvio universale pinsò non sarà fatto d'acqua, ma di tutti i nostri rifiuti accumulati nei secoli. Moriremo assuffucati dalla nostra stissa merda." :thumbup:


Good point. The Iliad and the Odyssey is fiction, though there was undoubteldy an historic basis, namely the Battle of Troy. A few points about that. Homer was from either Izmir (now Turkey's third largest city), or the nearby Greek island of Khios. I've travelled quite a bit down that way. It is doubtful Homer himself composed the epics. Poetry was recited from memory in classical times, rather than preserved in the written form - which came much later. I studied literature in the US and the Illiad and the Odyssey were on the curriculum, as was Don Quixote. In fact, I read the majority of the books on my fiction list two to three decades ago. Though literature is by far my biggest interest in life, during the past decade I've confined my reading mostly to novels from Africa and Asia (Turkey included), as well as a ton of non-fiction; generally history and politics. Sorry to disappoint you, but the only book on your list I've read is Pillars of the Earth.
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Sun, 15 Mar 2015, 21:47

Back before university I used to read a lot of books by James Michener. He was a prolific writer, weaving fiction into actual history in books that were often around the thousand page mark. The best, as I recall, were 'Hawaii,' 'Chesapeake,' 'The Source' (about Israel) and 'Caribbean.' I've also read 'Iberia,' 'Alaska,' 'Poland,' the 'Covenant' (about South Africa), 'Journey' (set in Canada) and 'Mexico,' among others. That was a fun way to learn about history, region by region.

As a kid I liked South Africa author Wilbur Smith a lot, and must have read at least 20 or so of his novels. I think his best efforts were when he wasn't actually writing about South Africa - notably 'Sunbird,' 'Elephant Song,' 'River God' - his first novel in the Egyptian series (the follow-ups were crap), and 'Shout at the Devil' - set in Tanzania during WWI, which was made into a Hollywood movie. 'When the Lion Feeds,' notwithstanding, I wasn't such a big fan of the Courtney or Balantyne series.'
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 260
Joined: Thu, 19 Jun 2014, 03:34
National Flag:
AustraliaAustralia

Re: Favourite Books

Postby rampage » Tue, 24 Mar 2015, 23:28

My favourites are:
'Nineteen Eighty-Four' by George Orwell
'Brave New World' by Aldous Huxley
'Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy' Trilogy (in 5 parts) by Douglas Adams
'The Running Man' by Richard Bachman (Stephen King)
'The Picture of Dorian Grey' by Oscar Wilde
'The Thursday Next' Series by Jasper Fforde
'American Psycho' by Bret Easton Ellis
The 'Tomorrow When the World Began' series by John Marsden
'How It Feels' by Brendan Cowell

The first four on this list I re-read every couple of years.

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Wed, 25 Mar 2015, 12:07

1984 and Brave New World are certainly among my favourite science fiction novels. Aldous Huxley was George Orwell's French teacher at Eton, you know, and the two later debated whose vision of the future was better. I think we can see Orwell's was more realistic, with many of his speculations already become fact, perhaps because it was a more political book. Brave New World focused more on the science and sociology of a long term future.

The only other books on your list I've read are The Picture of Dorian Grey and Tomorrow, When the World Began. The former was typical Oscar Wilde, witty and enjoyable, though not among my favourites. The latter had a good message but was downright cheesy. My favourite Australian book would be Harp in the South, while the best New Zealand novel I've read would probably be 'The Bone People.'
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Fri, 27 Mar 2015, 21:07

Am currently reading Tangata Whenua, an illustrated history of the Maori. Cost me a small fortune to have it sent out. It's a hardback with over 500 big glossy pages. So far I've read just 80. I read a great deal about this topic during my youth, particularly from an archaeological perspective, and it seems the findings are much the same. One thing they have been able to establish through DNA testing is that the Polynesians are ethnically more East Asian than Austroloid, although their languages are part of the Austronesian macro-family. The hybridization occurred once they arrived in Melanesia via (probably) the Philipines and Micronesia. Somehow they've managed to establish that Polynesian women were permitted to take Melanesian husbands, but that Polynesian men did not take Melanesian wives. It seems also that they have settled on a later date for the migrations to New Zealand from the Tahitian islands. This was once thought to have occurred just a few centuries after the migrations to Hawaii beginning in the sixth century, but now the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries seems to be the consensus. It seems a number of migrations were made during that lengthy period, covering a distance of over 4000kms. The possibility that Polynesians may have reached New Zealand from much closer islands, such as Tonga and Samoa, cannot be dismissed entirely, though there are no legends among the Maori to suggest this, no trace of Melanesian DNA has been found in New Zealand, and the Moriori are regarded as a Maori tribe which fled to the Chatham Islands to escape their enemies (and not a separate race). So these migrations were occurring in the time of the Mongols, Byzantium, the Black Death in Europe and the beginning of the 100 Years War between France and England (the Scots were still battling for their independence too). Meanwhile, the Italians had got as far as South East Asia. In fact, the first European to sight New Zealand, Dutchman Abel Tasman, did so just a mere four centuries or so after the Polynesians had reached it. The moa bird, including a variety which grew up to 3.6m and 230kg, disappeared within a century or two of the Polynesian arrival, being rapidly hunted into extinction (there were no land mammals in New Zealand, though the Polynesians brought livestock, dogs and rats). Finally, the Maori name for New Zealand, 'Aoteroa' (Land of the Long White Cloud - possibly signifying the snowcaps of the Southern Alps) was not widely used by the Maori until the coming of the Europeans. Prior to that its use was confined to a few tribes.
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 1676
Joined: Sun, 20 Apr 2014, 11:42
National Flag:
New ZealandNew Zealand

Re: Favourite Books

Postby YamahaKiwi » Mon, 06 Apr 2015, 06:18

My library mostly includes history, current events, travel writing and a few novels. Can't believe no one has mentioned Papillon yet! The God of Small Things is also in my collection. otherwise there's Martin Snedden's Stadium of 4 million, Brendan O'Shea's Crisis at Bihac looking at a particular area of the conflict in the former Yugoslavia, a couple of books by 20th century historian Antony Beevor including a fairly thick volume about the Spanish Civil War, Gomorrah, looking at the Italian mafia, Paul Theroux's legendary The Great Railway Bazaar (UK to Asia and back again) and it's follow up version when he went back and retraced his steps about 30 years later, and a few other railway travel stories including one guy who retraced Agatha Cristie's steps when she went by Orient Express to Iraq (British Mesopotamia at the time), just before the second Iraq War (The 8.55 to Baghdad).

I usually like to pick up a book about a place I'm visiting on a particular trip eg A Russian detective murder mystery when I was going to Moscow for the RWC7s (hey there weren't many English titles in the Italian bookshop!), The Berlin Wall by Frederick Taylor when I was there a few days before going to Russia, The King Years (Martin Luther King) and a very interesting book about the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam (now NYC) when I was in the US and NYC last year.

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Mon, 06 Apr 2015, 09:45

Yes, Papillon was great, actually a true story too, so perhaps I would find a place for that in my non-fiction list. Haven't read any of the other books you mentioned (The God of Small Things notwithstanding), but a few of them certainly look interesting. :thumbup:
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 1676
Joined: Sun, 20 Apr 2014, 11:42
National Flag:
New ZealandNew Zealand

Re: Favourite Books

Postby YamahaKiwi » Mon, 06 Apr 2015, 12:04

yeah I like them :)

this is some of the other ones I've got. Unfortunately a) my bookshelf is already full and b) books in NZ are pricey so I'm using the library most of the time now.

1. Under This tree & other (short) stories by Stanley Makuwe - stories from rural Zimbabwe
2. The Wolf by Richard Guilliatt & Peter Hohne - a WW1 German raider ship in the southern Ocean and near Aussie.
3. A Snake in the Shrine by David Geraghty - A Kiwi language school teacher's experiences in Japan
4. Crete by Antony Beevor
5. Chasing The Devil by Tim Butcher - One Brit journo's trip into the interior of Liberia and Sierra Leone a few years after the end of civil wars there.
6. The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien (my first ever adults book)
7. Strangers In My Sleeper by Peter Riordan - A Kiwi goes round the Indian subcontinent by sleeper train.
8. Beneath The Southern Cross (novel) by Graeme Sturgeon - A US whaler gets shipwrecked and taken captive by a local Maori group in Southern NZ in the early 1800s
9. Maori Peoples of NZ Nga Iwi O Aotearoa - a complete overview of every iwi (nation).
10. Last Stand in Singapore by Graham Clayton - the RNZAF 488 (Buffalo) fighter squadron in Singapore before it fell to the Japanese.
11. Urban Legend by John Edgar - story of a late former mayor of Auckland known for his vision and ego over a long period in office.
12. The Penguin History of NZ by the late great NZ historian Michael King. Several of his other books about Maori, Pakeha (UK white-descent NZers) and NZ society are well worth reading too.

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Mon, 06 Apr 2015, 21:36

Again, that's a fascinating-looking list. Of those I've only read The Hobbit, and that was eons ago when I was still at Intermediate School. I'd really like to get my hands on some of those others, notably those relating to the Maori community, but in Turkey that's unlikely - although there are plenty of good English language book stores around. In fact, there's such a good selection here that I very rarely order books from abroad, 'Tangata Whenua' being one exception. What we do have, of course, is a vast abundance of Turkish books, both fiction and non-fiction, especially in the original language. I've read a number of books in Turkish but it's really hard work, not like reading the newspapers at all, and I only do so if it's a book I really want to read and I can't get the English translation. I also read books sometimes in Spanish and French, which are a lot easier on the eye, though the first book I attempted in Spanish many years ago, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's '100 Years of Solitude,' was an absolute nightmare...
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 1091
Joined: Fri, 25 Apr 2014, 14:11
National Flag:
ZimbabweZimbabwe

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Sables4EVA » Tue, 07 Apr 2015, 07:05

Hey YK, try Peter Godwins books too. His book "Mukiwa" is a very open and frank look at how it was for a white person growing up in Zimbabwe. He is a brilliant writer and all his books are top notch.

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Mon, 13 Apr 2015, 11:10

:thumbup: This book 'The Invaders' looks like an interesting read, about how humans' success in befriending and taming wolves may have contributed to their superiority over Neanderthals and other hominid groups. When humans first arrived in Eurasia 45,000 years ago it was teeming with wildlife, including wooly elephant and rhinos, sabre-tooth tigers and giant bears. Neanderthals and other hominid groups were already there too. But by 27,000 years ago all of the above had disappeared. Archaeological evidence shows humans hunted wooly elephant excessively, but Neanderthals were small game hunters. Humans required heavy weaponry to kill elephants, and this was undoubtedly their main advantage. But the question is, did we wipe Neanderthal out, or did we simply absorb them?

Apparently archaeological evidence doesn't indicate a great deal of warfare between the two species. Meanwhile, DNA testing has shown that all humans except those in Sub Saharan Africa (Negro and Bushman) have between one and four per cent Neanderthal DNA. This means they were not only our 'cousins,' they are also our ancestors - or one of them. Neither were Neanderthals the dumb lugs they have become synonymous with. They were probably as intelligent as humans. Some of the famous cave paintings are believed to have been done by Neanderthals. Moreover, the hunting methods suggest they were likely less barbaric than the big game-hunting humans. So I'd imagine it was a combination of warfare, inter-breeding and the destruction of their natural habitat that led to the Neanderthals' demise at the hands of modern man.

The humans who lived in Europe during the Pleistocene 45,000 years ago faced a fierce world. Their populations had endured sweeping climate changes over the centuries, and they shared their landscape with animals as monstrous as anything the world had seen since the dinosaurs: massive cave bears, saber-toothed tigers, lions bigger than any in Africa today, cave hyenas, huge woolly mammoths, woolly rhinoceri, wolves, leopards, roving packs of dholes – a world as fearsome and strange as something out of a science fiction novel.

And one of the strangest things about that world was those humans themselves, because they weren’t us. They were squatter, heavier, hairier, much stronger. They had very large brains, very skillful hands, a strongly family-oriented culture, and considerable technological capabilities. They were a species of human we know as Homo neanderthalensis, the Neanderthals, and they’d lived and laughed and hunted and died for millennia in Eurasia, weathering radical climate shifts and game migrations, raising their young, caring for their infirm, and burying their dead.

Things had been like that in Eurasia for hundreds of thousands of years. Then, roughly 40,000 years ago, everything began to change in what, anthropologically speaking, amounts to an eye-blink of time. Cave bears, saber-toothed tigers, mammoths, rhinos, lions, leopards, dholes … fierce as they were, they all vanished from the forests and steppes of Eurasia. And Neanderthal populations first drastically dwindled and then vanished as well, and now, in our time, for two hundred years, ever since the discovery of the first Neanderthal fossils, debate has raged as to what caused this catastrophic die-off. Did the climate shift too suddenly for adaptation or migration to keep pace? Did reproductively vulnerable species ‘bottleneck’ and enter irretrievable decline? Unlike with the extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago, which was precipitated by a cataclysmic asteroid strike, the near-total extinction of the Pleistocene Eurasian species spectrum has no one prevailing theory to explain things.

There is an overwhelmingly likely culprit, however. Scientists, much like Sherlock Holmes, try never to theorize in advance of the facts, but nevertheless, something happened to the continent of Eurasia right before all its megafauna – including its resident species of human being – disappeared.

Modern humans happened. Homo sapiens arrived in Eurasia roughly 45,000 years ago, and very shortly thereafter, virtually every large species of prey animal and competing predator was gone. The patently obvious deduction is that Homo sapiens intentionally and methodically wiped out all those other species.


http://www.openlettersmonthly.com/blame ... nt-1527655
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Mon, 20 Apr 2015, 08:34

Since the death of Eduardo Galeano last week I've been reading this https://archive.org/stream/fp_Open_Vein ... a_djvu.txt on line. 100 pages so far, and it reminds me a lot of this http://www.historyisaweapon.com/zinnape ... story.html :thumbup: But I'm sure it will diverge considerably as it approaches the post-independence wars era.

By the way, anyone else have links to good reads online, whether it be e-book portals or individual texts? I've already been through my 'Project Gutenburg' phase :geek:
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 2844
Joined: Thu, 17 Apr 2014, 02:51
Location: São Paulo
National Flag:
BrazilBrazil

Re: Favourite Books

Postby victorsra » Tue, 28 Apr 2015, 13:54

Why nobody wrote Tom Brown's Schooldays? :lol:

:thumbup: This book 'The Invaders' looks like an interesting read, about how humans' success in befriending and taming wolves may have contributed to their superiority over Neanderthals and other hominid groups. When humans first arrived in Eurasia 45,000 years ago it was teeming with wildlife, including wooly elephant and rhinos, sabre-tooth tigers and giant bears. Neanderthals and other hominid groups were already there too. But by 27,000 years ago all of the above had disappeared. Archaeological evidence shows humans hunted wooly elephant excessively, but Neanderthals were small game hunters. Humans required heavy weaponry to kill elephants, and this was undoubtedly their main advantage. But the question is, did we wipe Neanderthal out, or did we simply absorb them?

Apparently archaeological evidence doesn't indicate a great deal of warfare between the two species. Meanwhile, DNA testing has shown that all humans except those in Sub Saharan Africa (Negro and Bushman) have between one and four per cent Neanderthal DNA. This means they were not only our 'cousins,' they are also our ancestors - or one of them. Neither were Neanderthals the dumb lugs they have become synonymous with. They were probably as intelligent as humans. Some of the famous cave paintings are believed to have been done by Neanderthals. Moreover, the hunting methods suggest they were likely less barbaric than the big game-hunting humans. So I'd imagine it was a combination of warfare, inter-breeding and the destruction of their natural habitat that led to the Neanderthals' demise at the hands of modern man.


You should read Jarred Diamond's "Germs, arms and steel". I am always resistent to determinsm-like idea, but he has very good ideas.

Since the death of Eduardo Galeano last week I've been reading this https://archive.org/stream/fp_Open_Vein ... a_djvu.txt on line. 100 pages so far, and it reminds me a lot of this http://www.historyisaweapon.com/zinnape ... story.html :thumbup: But I'm sure it will diverge considerably as it approaches the post-independence wars era.


The guy that understood better Latin American soul. And football :P
Brazilian Rugby News: www.portaldorugby.com.br

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Tue, 28 Apr 2015, 22:22

You should read Jarred Diamond's "Germs, arms and steel". I am always resistent to determinsm-like idea, but he has very good ideas.



If you are referring to 'Guns, Germs and Steel,' scroll up to the second post and you will find this listed at number 1 in my selection of non-fiction books. I've also got Diamond's 'The World Until Yesterday' in there at number 19. Brilliant writer, and very honest. He actually rates Papuans more intelligent than Westerners because on the island of New Guinea survival of the fittest still applies. Their knowledge of botany far exceeds the average gratuate's knowledge of their chosen subject, and most of them are polyglots - some fluent in more than a dozen languages, and these are not mere dialects but categorically separate languages, often more different from one another than English and German.

Code: Select all
The guy that understood better Latin American soul


Sure was a good read. I got through it in a few days, with very tired eyes! I would've liked to have learned a bit more about the actual process involved in Latin American independence from Spain and Portugal, but in a 300-page account there wasn't room for much detail. I wasn't aware Britain had screwed South America over so badly following their independence. I received a British education (and American university education), but never learnt about this. Of course, America has taken over from Britain during the past century or so, as it has done elsewhere, to ensure no let-up in the screwing over department . . .
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

Posts: 2844
Joined: Thu, 17 Apr 2014, 02:51
Location: São Paulo
National Flag:
BrazilBrazil

Re: Favourite Books

Postby victorsra » Wed, 29 Apr 2015, 02:19

Sorry, missed it. And yes, that book, great stuff :)
Brazilian Rugby News: www.portaldorugby.com.br

Posts: 718
Joined: Thu, 17 Apr 2014, 20:56
National Flag:
GeorgiaGeorgia

Re: Favourite Books

Postby fullbackace » Fri, 08 May 2015, 13:16

Rowan wrote:
19 Memed my Hawk - Yasar Kemal


Pimp My Ride in turkish?
Don't Pray For Easy lives, Pray for enough Beer!

Posts: 4294
Joined: Mon, 26 May 2014, 05:50
National Flag:
TurkeyTurkey

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Rowan » Fri, 08 May 2015, 14:57

fullbackace wrote:
Rowan wrote:
19 Memed my Hawk - Yasar Kemal


Pimp My Ride in turkish?


Not familiar with any book by that name, sorry. But Memed my Hawk is the story of a young renegade in southern Turkey about a century ago when village chieftains known as 'aghas' still ruled like princes within their domains. It's a great book which no movie can do justice, but Ustinov's wit makes the above film adaptation worth watching in spite of its age and low budget.

Today I bought a couple of novels, Neel Mukherjee's The Lives of Others and Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees.

I'm trying to recall the name of former All Black Murray Kidd's wife. Wasn't her name Sue Kidd too? She wrote an autobiographical novel about being married to an All Black. After that she became assistant editor at Rugby News for a number of years. This is going back about three decades.
If they're good enough to play at World Cups, then why not in between?

User avatar
Posts: 356
Joined: Sun, 25 Jan 2015, 20:30
National Flag:
MexicoMexico

Re: Favourite Books

Postby Hansgrohe » Thu, 14 May 2015, 17:48

Anyone here read Flight by Sherman Alexie? Short but awesome.

Next

Return to Other subjects

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests