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Japan Rugby

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 22:46

This is the final result of a terrible SANZAAR administration of Super Rugby.... but that's not only SANZAAR's fault.

IMO, it was pretty clear for long time Super Rugby's format of having SA playing regular season matches in Oceania wasn't viable (and AFAIK one of the reasons Japan left was SA realy didn't wanting to travel there ....and who can blame them? They already travel too much). But NOBODY questioned this core problem because Super Rugby's first goal was always to make Springboks, All Blacks, Wallabies strong. With this in mind, almost every single coach of Super Rugby always dismissed the idea of not having SA-NZ clashes in the regular season. They were never thinking Super Rugby as a proper league, only as a path for athletes to the national teams.

Woudn't it be much more rational and life-saving if they had structured the Super Rugby in two independent conferences, East and West, bringing Asian money and fans to the East (and treating them as equals), while properly making better foundations for Argentina in the West? There's no problems with interconference clashes basicaly happening in the playoffs (with money evenly distributed among conference, to make sure playoffs are played by squads the fans understand as good, credible teams). Plus, Super Rugby always needed to operate as a proper unified league, which means All Blacks in Japan should be equal All Blacks in NZ, available for caps.

If people cared about Sharks vs Crusaders, the playoffs (or a 2nd quick groups phase before playoffs) would deliver it anyway. Meanwhile, why bother making the Kings play in Melbourne? Super Rugby lost money, was left behind in the international market dispute against European clubs and lost its own fans faith with ludicrous formats. Just because people in both sides were too tied to the idea the Super Rugby existed to serve the national teams. So, congratulation, it is melting and it won't have the best market that emerged recently. And don't blame COVID....
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 23:07

victorsra wrote:This is the final result of a terrible SANZAAR administration of Super Rugby.... but that's not only SANZAAR's fault.

IMO, it was pretty clear for long time Super Rugby's format of having SA playing regular season matches in Oceania wasn't viable (and AFAIK one of the reasons Japan left was SA realy didn't wanting to travel there ....and who can blame them? They already travel too much). But NOBODY questioned this core problem because Super Rugby's first goal was always to make Springboks, All Blacks, Wallabies strong. With this in mind, almost every single coach of Super Rugby always dismissed the idea of not having SA-NZ clashes in the regular season. They were never thinking Super Rugby as a proper league, only as a path for athletes to the national teams.

Woudn't it be much more rational and life-saving if they had structured the Super Rugby in two independent conferences, East and West, bringing Asian money and fans to the East (and treating them as equals), while properly making better foundations for Argentina in the West? There's no problems with interconference clashes basicaly happening in the playoffs (with money evenly distributed among conference, to make sure playoffs are played by squads the fans understand as good, credible teams). Plus, Super Rugby always needed to operate as a proper unified league, which means All Blacks in Japan should be equal All Blacks in NZ, available for caps.

If people cared about Sharks vs Crusaders, the playoffs (or a 2nd quick groups phase before playoffs) would deliver it anyway. Meanwhile, why bother making the Kings play in Melbourne? Super Rugby lost money, was left behind in the international market dispute against European clubs and lost its own fans faith with ludicrous formats. Just because people in both sides were too tied to the idea the Super Rugby existed to serve the national teams. So, congratulation, it is melting and it won't have the best market that emerged recently. And don't blame COVID....


The introduction of the conference model when S15 came along was set up to address a lot of those issues and worked quite well. Up until SA needed to shoehorn in a 6th franchise and insisted on having two pools in their conference. Which completely cocked things up. The Sunwolves should have entered in the Aus conference from day one.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Sat, 27 Jun 2020, 23:23

More or less, because it kept the possibility of a team with less points in front of a team with more points just because of the country. It always made the competition controversial for most fans. You either completely split, like I said, or make a round-robin (that became the spirit behind the force wanting to change SR). What they did basicaly took alway fans trust in the fairness of what they were watching. They wanted to be NFL, but in NFL you play like half of the teams in the league, so it doesn't generate that farse sentiment in fans when a team with more points is left behind.

Plus, it also made it necessary to have the equal number of teams in each group, what is not logical because each region has a different situation, as we are talking about a transcontinental league. If you want to grow in the Japanense market, you shouldn't need to care about how many teams there are in South Africa. If South Africa has a political problem and realy needs 6 teams, you shoudn't need to care about how many Japanese or Australian teams there are.

Why not, let's say, West with 7 teams (1 ARG, 6 SA), East with 13 (5 NZ, 5 AUS, 2 JAP, 1 PI)? That's why I say independent conferences, almost two different leagues that co-operate, to address each region's issues and opportunities better, only crossing conferences in the final phase. You don't need conferences balance in number of teams in a transcontinental league. You need only a regional regular season with meaningful rivalries and exciting matches and a strong intercontinental playoffs finish. It shoud be almost like if Premiership, Top 14, PRO14 were under the same organization, deeply co-operating, followed by the Champions Cup.

"Oh but 13 teams in a conference and 7 in other is bizarre". Ok, brand "Super Rugby" only the final phase, giving the conference league names, and this is solved. But both leagues under SANZAAR auspices, to promote both, broadcast both in all countries, and etc.

The Super 15 didn't offered such maleabilty.
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 01:14

victorsra wrote:More or less, because it kept the possibility of a team with less points in front of a team with more points just because of the country. It always made the competition controversial for most fans. You either completely split, like I said, or make a round-robin (that became the spirit behind the force wanting to change SR). What they did basicaly took alway fans trust in the fairness of what they were watching. They wanted to be NFL, but in NFL you play like half of the teams in the league, so it doesn't generate that farse sentiment in fans when a team with more points is left behind.

Plus, it also made it necessary to have the equal number of teams in each group, what is not logical because each region has a different situation, as we are talking about a transcontinental league. If you want to grow in the Japanense market, you shouldn't need to care about how many teams there are in South Africa. If South Africa has a political problem and realy needs 6 teams, you shoudn't need to care about how many Japanese or Australian teams there are.

Why not, let's say, West with 7 teams (1 ARG, 6 SA), East with 13 (5 NZ, 5 AUS, 2 JAP, 1 PI)? That's why I say independent conferences, almost two different leagues that co-operate, to address each region's issues and opportunities better, only crossing conferences in the final phase. You don't need conferences balance in number of teams in a transcontinental league. You need only a regional regular season with meaningful rivalries and exciting matches and a strong intercontinental playoffs finish. It shoud be almost like if Premiership, Top 14, PRO14 were under the same organization, deeply co-operating, followed by the Champions Cup.

"Oh but 13 teams in a conference and 7 in other is bizarre". Ok, brand "Super Rugby" only the final phase, giving the conference league names, and this is solved. But both leagues under SANZAAR auspices, to promote both, broadcast both in all countries, and etc.

The Super 15 didn't offered such maleabilty.


This is something many in Australia have advocating for, for a long time. Two independent structures that have some kind of crossover series. Ideally in the form of a Trans-Tasman league and a largely Currie Cup structure with Argentine involvement. But both SA and NZ have been resistant to the concept up until recently.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby 4N » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 01:36

Working Class Rugger wrote:
victorsra wrote:This is the final result of a terrible SANZAAR administration of Super Rugby.... but that's not only SANZAAR's fault.

IMO, it was pretty clear for long time Super Rugby's format of having SA playing regular season matches in Oceania wasn't viable (and AFAIK one of the reasons Japan left was SA realy didn't wanting to travel there ....and who can blame them? They already travel too much). But NOBODY questioned this core problem because Super Rugby's first goal was always to make Springboks, All Blacks, Wallabies strong. With this in mind, almost every single coach of Super Rugby always dismissed the idea of not having SA-NZ clashes in the regular season. They were never thinking Super Rugby as a proper league, only as a path for athletes to the national teams.

Woudn't it be much more rational and life-saving if they had structured the Super Rugby in two independent conferences, East and West, bringing Asian money and fans to the East (and treating them as equals), while properly making better foundations for Argentina in the West? There's no problems with interconference clashes basicaly happening in the playoffs (with money evenly distributed among conference, to make sure playoffs are played by squads the fans understand as good, credible teams). Plus, Super Rugby always needed to operate as a proper unified league, which means All Blacks in Japan should be equal All Blacks in NZ, available for caps.

If people cared about Sharks vs Crusaders, the playoffs (or a 2nd quick groups phase before playoffs) would deliver it anyway. Meanwhile, why bother making the Kings play in Melbourne? Super Rugby lost money, was left behind in the international market dispute against European clubs and lost its own fans faith with ludicrous formats. Just because people in both sides were too tied to the idea the Super Rugby existed to serve the national teams. So, congratulation, it is melting and it won't have the best market that emerged recently. And don't blame COVID....


The introduction of the conference model when S15 came along was set up to address a lot of those issues and worked quite well. Up until SA needed to shoehorn in a 6th franchise and insisted on having two pools in their conference. Which completely cocked things up. The Sunwolves should have entered in the Aus conference from day one.


Yep and like you said Australia were in Japan’s corner and didn’t want them cut from SR, and now they are leading the call to involve them in the future. I think there will be some kind of link between Australian/NZ franchises and Japanese clubs going forward, whether it’s a TT league that has a joint finals format or a Cup competition.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 02:32

4N wrote:
Working Class Rugger wrote:
victorsra wrote:This is the final result of a terrible SANZAAR administration of Super Rugby.... but that's not only SANZAAR's fault.

IMO, it was pretty clear for long time Super Rugby's format of having SA playing regular season matches in Oceania wasn't viable (and AFAIK one of the reasons Japan left was SA realy didn't wanting to travel there ....and who can blame them? They already travel too much). But NOBODY questioned this core problem because Super Rugby's first goal was always to make Springboks, All Blacks, Wallabies strong. With this in mind, almost every single coach of Super Rugby always dismissed the idea of not having SA-NZ clashes in the regular season. They were never thinking Super Rugby as a proper league, only as a path for athletes to the national teams.

Woudn't it be much more rational and life-saving if they had structured the Super Rugby in two independent conferences, East and West, bringing Asian money and fans to the East (and treating them as equals), while properly making better foundations for Argentina in the West? There's no problems with interconference clashes basicaly happening in the playoffs (with money evenly distributed among conference, to make sure playoffs are played by squads the fans understand as good, credible teams). Plus, Super Rugby always needed to operate as a proper unified league, which means All Blacks in Japan should be equal All Blacks in NZ, available for caps.

If people cared about Sharks vs Crusaders, the playoffs (or a 2nd quick groups phase before playoffs) would deliver it anyway. Meanwhile, why bother making the Kings play in Melbourne? Super Rugby lost money, was left behind in the international market dispute against European clubs and lost its own fans faith with ludicrous formats. Just because people in both sides were too tied to the idea the Super Rugby existed to serve the national teams. So, congratulation, it is melting and it won't have the best market that emerged recently. And don't blame COVID....


The introduction of the conference model when S15 came along was set up to address a lot of those issues and worked quite well. Up until SA needed to shoehorn in a 6th franchise and insisted on having two pools in their conference. Which completely cocked things up. The Sunwolves should have entered in the Aus conference from day one.


Yep and like you said Australia were in Japan’s corner and didn’t want them cut from SR, and now they are leading the call to involve them in the future. I think there will be some kind of link between Australian/NZ franchises and Japanese clubs going forward, whether it’s a TT league that has a joint finals format or a Cup competition.



With any luck we'll see some kind of Cup competition emerge

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 02:52

Yes, I hope so, but, according to Hinato, it looks like the Japan opportunity is going away....

Wasn't 1993-1994-1995 Super 10 a cup like this?

Ideally in the form of a Trans-Tasman league and a largely Currie Cup structure with Argentine involvement.


Yes, but Currie Cup with matches in Argentina (and not an exiled Argentina team...)

But both SA and NZ have been resistant to the concept up until recently.

Yes, and you can see this very clearly when SA-NZ (specialy NZ) Super Rugby coaches talked in the past years about it. Most influencial people basicaly not thinking about the big picture. Wasn't SANZAAR alone.
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby theDarky » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 16:47

Super 10 was clearly a champions cup style competition for south african (using the currie cup) and new zealand (using the NPC) provinces.

From an australian perspective, only the NSW and Queensland provinces existed at this time.

It offered an objective for the pacific nations too (western samoa, tonga and fidgi played the pacific tri nations at this time).

It was very competitive as you had the best teams of each nations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_10_(rugby_union)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Tri-Nations

and the previous competition:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Pac ... ampionship

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 09:34

Japanese New League: become the best rugby league in the world!

In a long press interview this weekend, Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi revealed many details on the future Japanese league which will see the light of day in the fall of 2021 while we will have information on the candidates this coming week.


The JRFU aims to host the rugby world cup again in the next 30 years and to see the Brave Blossoms win the competition for a historic first.


For this, the creation of the New League has two main objectives:

Create the best rugby union championship in the world.

Coexistence and co-prosperity with the Japanese selection. It's win-win for both. A strong national team will draw spectators to the New League.

There will be three major changes compared to the Top League:

The New League will be managed independently of the Japanese rugby federation as we can see in France with the FFR and the LNR.

Matching performance by teams and a deep regional distribution.

Marketing and socialization of rugby.

The composition of the New League:

This will be divided into three divisions. The first two will correspond to the teams that have met the entry conditions. The 3rd division will be that for the teams which cannot pass from the corporate structure to that professional. Thus in this division, there will be no obligation for the players to be pros.

Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi however intends to install a "cup" which would see the corporate teams of this 3rd division face those professional on the model of the cup of the Emperor in football in Japan.

Many franchises at the moment are not ready for an immediate transition to professionalism. Also the entry conditions have been relaxed but Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi specifies that from 2024, the end of the corporate model will be mandatory to integrate or stay in the new Japanese national rugby union championship.


The 5 obligations in the New League from 2024:

Competitiveness. Franchises must have a team ready to play in the best rugby league in the world. They will also have to plan a training program and method, follow educational training and medical care.

Installation. Each team must secure a host stadium with a minimum capacity of 15,000 seats with an occupancy rate of at least 50% for home games.

Organization. Franchises will manage ticket sales.

Requirement. Teams must have a uniform contract for professional athletes. They will now be 100% professional. End of player-employees.

Finance. A salary cap system will be installed in each team.

In the important obligations to note also, there is the academy. The problem of training young people in Japan is important. The Brave Blossoms had no U20 international during the world cup unlike France for example.


Also, future franchises in the New League will have to have U12 and U15 teams (at this age, the majority of Japanese children quit the oval sport, for lack of clubs). Teams will also be recommended to have a women's section.

The New League will start with 25 teams!

Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi (general manager of the New League Corporation) has just revealed that 25 teams have presented themselves candidates and have met the requirements to join the future New League (not all have responded to the pro part).

These are the 16 Top League teams, the 8 from the Top Challenge League and Chugoku Red Regulions (champion of the Top Kyushu A League, 3rd division) who will start in this future New League. The latter will be composed of two professional divisions and a third corporate one. The 25 franchises will be divided between these three championships. Their place will be decided according to two points: the criteria to evolve or not in the pros and their sports performance during the 2020/2021 season (January 2021-May 2021).


Suffice to say that the arms race promises to be explosive for the big Japanese rugby teams. The 1st professional division should be composed at best of 8 or 9 franchises, enough to give birth to an extremely tough championship! Other teams could apply to join the New League. We are talking in particular about Tokyo Gas (defending champion of the Top East A League, 3rd division).

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Pedro1 » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 12:09

These are very exciting news coming from Japan. I honestly believe that, if they set up a true professional system, rugby will finally have a legitimate place in the mainstream sport world.

To this day we still only have one true professional system (France)

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 14:41

Hinato wrote:Japanese New League: become the best rugby league in the world!

In a long press interview this weekend, Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi revealed many details on the future Japanese league which will see the light of day in the fall of 2021 while we will have information on the candidates this coming week.


The JRFU aims to host the rugby world cup again in the next 30 years and to see the Brave Blossoms win the competition for a historic first.


For this, the creation of the New League has two main objectives:

Create the best rugby union championship in the world.

Coexistence and co-prosperity with the Japanese selection. It's win-win for both. A strong national team will draw spectators to the New League.

There will be three major changes compared to the Top League:

The New League will be managed independently of the Japanese rugby federation as we can see in France with the FFR and the LNR.

Matching performance by teams and a deep regional distribution.

Marketing and socialization of rugby.

The composition of the New League:

This will be divided into three divisions. The first two will correspond to the teams that have met the entry conditions. The 3rd division will be that for the teams which cannot pass from the corporate structure to that professional. Thus in this division, there will be no obligation for the players to be pros.

Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi however intends to install a "cup" which would see the corporate teams of this 3rd division face those professional on the model of the cup of the Emperor in football in Japan.

Many franchises at the moment are not ready for an immediate transition to professionalism. Also the entry conditions have been relaxed but Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi specifies that from 2024, the end of the corporate model will be mandatory to integrate or stay in the new Japanese national rugby union championship.


The 5 obligations in the New League from 2024:

Competitiveness. Franchises must have a team ready to play in the best rugby league in the world. They will also have to plan a training program and method, follow educational training and medical care.

Installation. Each team must secure a host stadium with a minimum capacity of 15,000 seats with an occupancy rate of at least 50% for home games.

Organization. Franchises will manage ticket sales.

Requirement. Teams must have a uniform contract for professional athletes. They will now be 100% professional. End of player-employees.

Finance. A salary cap system will be installed in each team.

In the important obligations to note also, there is the academy. The problem of training young people in Japan is important. The Brave Blossoms had no U20 international during the world cup unlike France for example.


Also, future franchises in the New League will have to have U12 and U15 teams (at this age, the majority of Japanese children quit the oval sport, for lack of clubs). Teams will also be recommended to have a women's section.

The New League will start with 25 teams!

Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi (general manager of the New League Corporation) has just revealed that 25 teams have presented themselves candidates and have met the requirements to join the future New League (not all have responded to the pro part).

These are the 16 Top League teams, the 8 from the Top Challenge League and Chugoku Red Regulions (champion of the Top Kyushu A League, 3rd division) who will start in this future New League. The latter will be composed of two professional divisions and a third corporate one. The 25 franchises will be divided between these three championships. Their place will be decided according to two points: the criteria to evolve or not in the pros and their sports performance during the 2020/2021 season (January 2021-May 2021).


Suffice to say that the arms race promises to be explosive for the big Japanese rugby teams. The 1st professional division should be composed at best of 8 or 9 franchises, enough to give birth to an extremely tough championship! Other teams could apply to join the New League. We are talking in particular about Tokyo Gas (defending champion of the Top East A League, 3rd division).

Awesome, realy.

Do you believe some teams will look for relocation? I saw your article https://www.asierugby.com/post/new-leag ... franchises and I was thinking about cities like Kitakyushu, Kumamoto, Oita and Sapporo.
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 18:19

With the team package on Tokyo, we can hope to see several franchises move and settle in major cities like Kumamoto, Oita, Kyoto, Yokohama, Sendai and Sapporo.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 20:11

And no hope for the Sunwolves?
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 20:40

victorsra wrote:And no hope for the Sunwolves?


The leaders do not want to join the New League ... it smells bad in the Sunwolves at the moment. Everyone leaves the ship (staff, players).

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 20:41

:s

Another question: what's the situation of Prince Chichibu Stadium for now and for 2021?
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 21:43

victorsra wrote::s

Another question: what's the situation of Prince Chichibu Stadium for now and for 2021?


New Chichibu Stadium 2025 => Tokyo Gas.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Wed, 01 Jul 2020, 21:46

Interesting. Tokyo Gas is the origin of FC Tokyo as well.
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 05:43

The list of teams that will participate in the launch of the New League in January 2022 is now known (25 in total). But the question is now knowing where these franchises will evolve. If for 2/3 of them, we almost know where they will be based and where they will play, it is the total blur for the last 1/3. Here is an overview:


Toyota Verblitz = Toyota City, Toyota Stadium (45,000 seats)


Kobelco Steelers = Kobe, Noevir Stadium Kobe (30,132 seats)


Kintetsu Liners = Higashi-Osaka, Hanazono Stadium (26,544 seats)


Kurita Water Gush = Kawasaki, Kawasaki Todoroki Stadium (26,232 seats)


Panasonic Wild Knights = Kumagaya, Kumagaya Rugby Stadium (24,000 seats)


Coca-Cola Red Sparks and Kyuden Voltex = Fukuoka, Level-5 Stadium (22,000 seats)


NTT-Docomo Red Hurricanes = Osaka, Osaka Expo '70 Stadium (21,000 seats)


Kubota Spears = Chiba, Fukuda Denshi Arena (19,781 seats)


NEC Green Rockets = Kashiwa, Hitachi Kashiwa Soccer Stadium (15,349 seats)


Mitsubishi Sagamihara Dynaboars = Sagamihara, Sagamihara Gion Stadium (15,300 seats)


Yamaha Jubilo = Iwata, Yamaha Stadium (15,165 seats)


Shimizu Blue Sharks = Yokohama, NHK Spring Mitsuzawa Football Stadium (15,046 seats)


Canon Eagles = Machida, Machida GION Stadium (15,000 seats)


Toyota Industries Shuttles = Nagoya, Paloma Mizuho Rugby Stadium (15,000 seats)


Honda Heat = Suzuka, Mie Sports Garden (12,000 seats)


Chugoku Red Regulions = Hiroshima, Bingo Stadium (10,000 seats)


Mazda Blue Zoomers = Hiroshima, Hiroshima Koiki Park Stadium No.1 (10,000 seats)


Munakata Sanix Blues = Munakata, Global Arena (10,000 seats)


Kamaishi Seawaves = Kamaishi, Kamaishi Recovery Memorial Stadium (6,000 seats)


Of the 20 franchises mentioned, 15 meet one of the priority requirements to be able to play in the first two professional divisions (to have a stadium with a minimum capacity of 15,000 seats). One can imagine that Munakata Sanix Blues and Honda Heat should not delay to renovate and enlarge their stadium by building a new grandstand. Could Kamaishi Seawaves do the same (do they really have the means?) Or will they then decide to move to play in a larger and more consistent stadium?


Tokyo, the Japanese megalopolis, is a major concern for five teams that are based inside or just around it. These teams will have to fight to find a stadium and most of them are likely to base themselves further on the regions of Tohoku or Kansai for example like the J-League teams in the 90s.


These five franchises are Suntory Sungoliath, Toshiba Brave Lupus, Hino Red Dolphins, Ricoh Black Rams and NTT Shining Arcs.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 13:07

Suntory Sungoliath holds the replacement for Matt Giteau! The Fuchu (Tokyo) franchise will sign the opener Beauden Barrett (Blues)! The New Zealand international (83 caps), world rugby champion in 2015, agrees to a 2-year contract and an annual salary of 865,000 euros. This is a huge blow for Suntory Sungoliath and a huge advertisement for the New League (professional championship) which will be launched in January 2022!


The Japanese teams are currently engaged in a monstrous arms race because the classification next season will count for the choice of franchises which can integrate the 1st professional division (8 or 9 teams at best). With all due respect for Béziers, the French club had no chance of being able to compete.


Beauden Barrett will form from next year one of the best hinges in the world with the very best as 1/2 of scrum in the Japanese archipelago at the moment, namely the Japanese international Yutaka Nagare and the young Japanese phenomenon Naoto Saito!


It now remains to be seen in which stage the yellow and black will evolve. The New Zealand international will thus participate in the last season of Top League (January-May 2021) and in the very first of the future Japanese Pro League (January-May 2022).


2020/2021 arrivals:


Pillar - Kan Nakano (JAP) - Tokai Univ. - 09/29/1997 - 176 cm - 118 kg

1/2 scrum - Naoto Saito (JAP) - Waseda Univ. - 08/26/1997 - 165 cm - 75 kg

1/2 opening - Beauden Barrett (NZ, 83 caps) - Blues - 05/27/1991 - 187 cm - 92 kg

Center - Shogo Nakano (JAP) - Waseda Univ. - 06/11/1997 - 186 cm - 100 kg


Departures 2020/2021:


Defense coach - George Smith (AUS) - free - 07/17/1980


2nd line - Joe Wheeler (NZ) - free - 20/10/1987 - 200 cm - 114 kg

3rd line - Satoshi Oshima (JAP) - free - 01/01/1988 - 181 cm - 98 kg

1/2 scrum - Kazutaka Ashida (JAP) - free - 07/03/1990 - 172 cm - 76 kg

1/2 opening - Kosei Ono (JAP, 34 caps) - Munakata S.B. - 04/17/1987 - 171 cm - 81 kg

1/2 opening - Matt Giteau (AUS, 103 caps) - retreat - 9/29/1982 - 178 cm - 86 kg

Center - Ryutaro Takemoto (JAP) - free - 19/05/1988 - 172 cm - 83 kg

Center - Shohei Takeshita (JAP) - free - 06/05/1989 - 177 cm - 83 kg

Wingman - Chihito Matsui (JAP, 2 caps) - loose - 11/11/1994 - 183 cm - 84 kg

Rear - Kotaro Matsushima (JAP, 39 caps) - Clermont - 02/26/1993 - 178 cm - 88 kg

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 17:24

Wow that is huge. So 2022 it’s launching....will Beauden stay an All Black or be forced to retire?

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 17:49

Hinato wrote: The composition of the New League:

This will be divided into three divisions. The first two will correspond to the teams that have met the entry conditions. The 3rd division will be that for the teams which cannot pass from the corporate structure to that professional. Thus in this division, there will be no obligation for the players to be pros.

Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi however intends to install a "cup" which would see the corporate teams of this 3rd division face those professional on the model of the cup of the Emperor in football in Japan.

Many franchises at the moment are not ready for an immediate transition to professionalism. Also the entry conditions have been relaxed but Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi specifies that from 2024, the end of the corporate model will be mandatory to integrate or stay in the new Japanese national rugby union championship.


The 5 obligations in the New League from 2024:

Competitiveness. Franchises must have a team ready to play in the best rugby league in the world. They will also have to plan a training program and method, follow educational training and medical care.

Installation. Each team must secure a host stadium with a minimum capacity of 15,000 seats with an occupancy rate of at least 50% for home games.

Organization. Franchises will manage ticket sales.

Requirement. Teams must have a uniform contract for professional athletes. They will now be 100% professional. End of player-employees.

Finance. A salary cap system will be installed in each team.

In the important obligations to note also, there is the academy. The problem of training young people in Japan is important. The Brave Blossoms had no U20 international during the world cup unlike France for example.


Also, future franchises in the New League will have to have U12 and U15 teams (at this age, the majority of Japanese children quit the oval sport, for lack of clubs). Teams will also be recommended to have a women's section.

The New League will start with 25 teams!


This is righteous!

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby 4N » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 19:52

Tobar wrote:Wow that is huge. So 2022 it’s launching....will Beauden stay an All Black or be forced to retire?


Apparently only gone for next Super Rugby season and won’t miss internationals.

https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/sport/420381 ... all-blacks

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Thu, 02 Jul 2020, 22:22

The NZRU fought very hard to succeed (one year contract instead of two). And it is not until 2022 that the Japanese will really send the sauce. New Zealand rugby is too fragile to withstand the coming Japanese Pro League in the medium term.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby thatrugbyguy » Fri, 03 Jul 2020, 00:27

So is Australia. We can't compete against both Europe and Asia.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby TheStroBro » Fri, 03 Jul 2020, 04:34

Hinato wrote:The NZRU fought very hard to succeed (one year contract instead of two). And it is not until 2022 that the Japanese will really send the sauce. New Zealand rugby is too fragile to withstand the coming Japanese Pro League in the medium term.


Perfectly able, they just hold the jersey.

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