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Japan Rugby

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Thu, 16 Jul 2020, 16:14

Would be cool a strong Osaka derby.
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Thu, 16 Jul 2020, 20:11

Hinato wrote:Japanese Pro League: Panasonic Wild Knights has unveiled its future installations!
https://www.asierugby.com/post/pro-leag ... tallations

The Japanese Pro League will be launched in January 2022. By then, franchises are preparing to shift to professionalism. This is the case of Panasonic Wild Knights, which has just unveiled its future installations.

These will be based in the Kumagaya Sports & Culture Park, located just a few hundred meters west of the Kumagaya Rugby Stadium (24,000 seats), the future stadium of the Japanese team. The facilities will be 30,000 square meters in size.

Construction will begin this month and will be completed next August. The total construction cost will be 3,490 million yen (about 28.7 million).

Panasonic has a 35-year lease with Saitama Prefecture and the prefecture association and plans to use it as its headquarters. The hotel can accommodate up to 300 people and is also available for general use.

These state-of-the-art facilities will include:

a rugby training ground

an administrative building

an indoor playground

an accommodation building

a restaurant

a club house

Panasonic Wild Knights will be 100% professional in its structure by January 2022, the date of the launch of the future Pro League. The Japanese franchise will have one of the most modern stadiums and facilities in the world for a rugby team. Kumagaya thinks big!



Very nice facilities but where are the stands?

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Fri, 17 Jul 2020, 00:10

Tobar wrote:
Hinato wrote:Japanese Pro League: Panasonic Wild Knights has unveiled its future installations!
https://www.asierugby.com/post/pro-leag ... tallations

The Japanese Pro League will be launched in January 2022. By then, franchises are preparing to shift to professionalism. This is the case of Panasonic Wild Knights, which has just unveiled its future installations.

These will be based in the Kumagaya Sports & Culture Park, located just a few hundred meters west of the Kumagaya Rugby Stadium (24,000 seats), the future stadium of the Japanese team. The facilities will be 30,000 square meters in size.

Construction will begin this month and will be completed next August. The total construction cost will be 3,490 million yen (about 28.7 million).

Panasonic has a 35-year lease with Saitama Prefecture and the prefecture association and plans to use it as its headquarters. The hotel can accommodate up to 300 people and is also available for general use.

These state-of-the-art facilities will include:

a rugby training ground

an administrative building

an indoor playground

an accommodation building

a restaurant

a club house

Panasonic Wild Knights will be 100% professional in its structure by January 2022, the date of the launch of the future Pro League. The Japanese franchise will have one of the most modern stadiums and facilities in the world for a rugby team. Kumagaya thinks big!



Very nice facilities but where are the stands?


The stadium is next door.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Osmanperalta » Fri, 17 Jul 2020, 01:19

Very nice facilities but where are the stands?

there
Image

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Fri, 17 Jul 2020, 01:59

Oh derp I read that too quickly and missed the whole “next door to the stadium” thing.

@osman where did you find that pic? Looks very nice, super exciting.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Osmanperalta » Fri, 17 Jul 2020, 03:02

Tobar wrote:Oh derp I read that too quickly and missed the whole “next door to the stadium” thing.

@osman where did you find that pic? Looks very nice, super exciting.

there is a video on twitter
https://twitter.com/quirk_WILD04/status/1283018695166455808

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 12:21

What future for the Sunwolves?

After 25 years of existence, Super Rugby will disappear. If this has been the trend for a while, the current crisis due to the coronavirus pandemic will have accelerated it.

Since then, all the cards have been reshuffled. New Zealanders and Australians will focus from 2021 on a common championship, with the entry of a team from the Pacific Islands. South Africa should look to Europe, which will have the major consequence of the arrival of the Springboks in a future 7 Nations tournament.

Finally, the Argentines, who do not have a sufficiently solid base locally, see the disappearance of the Jaguares and the exile of the internationals to the European championships and the American Major League Rugby.

And the Sunwolves in all of this, what will become of them? A few weeks ago, Yuji Watase (general manager of the Japanese franchise) refused to integrate the team in the future Japanese Pro League when the doors were wide open and there was already talk of basing the Sunwolves in the Level -5 Fukuoka Stadium.

Yuji Watase wants his team to play in a foreign professional championship. But the reality is more complicated. The impact of the coronavirus has got the better of all the nations of the southern hemisphere who are turning in on themselves. Worse, the Japanese franchise saw the departure of its entire workforce. The players have made their return or signed in Top League and Top Challenge League teams, see abroad.

Japanese technician Keisuke Sawaki, fifth Sunwolves head coach in as many seasons in Super Rugby, went to take command of the Canon Eagles by succeeding South African Allister Coetzee with the goal of professionalizing and preparing the reds and blacks for the future Japanese Pro League.

The finding is terrible. While the Japanese franchises are turned towards the New League which will start in January 2022, the Sunwolves have no horizon at present. Fortunately, Mrs. Mayumi Taniguchi (General Manager of the New League Corporation) announced that new teams will be able to apply by the end of the year to join the Pro League from 2023. The last hope for the Tokyo franchise , who will have played in Super Rugby for 5 years, is now there.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 12:21

Japanese want transcontinental tournament with New Zealanders and Australians

With the coming disappearance of Super Rugby, all the cards are shuffled. And the Japanese have understood this and intend to take advantage of the situation. Director Yuichiro Fujii, who is in charge of strengthening the Japan Rugby Association's national team, has a long-term goal of strengthening the Japanese team in anticipation of the 2023 Rugby World Cup in France.

Yuichiro Fujii thus plans to create a tournament which will pit the best franchises in the Top League (and then in the Pro League from 2022) against those of New Zealand and Australia who will dominate their new championship.

He called for the need for an opportunity for strong teams to compete. "It will improve the level and value of the domestic league and the teams will gain international experience." The tournament will take place if it materializes in June. Brave Blossoms coach Jamie Joseph has already lent his support to Yuichiro Fujii.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby 4N » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 15:13

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2020 ... ament.html

This is the logical way to go. Japan has the money and the large market and Australia and NZ have the knowhow and quality teams that can help Japan lift the standard of their rugby.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 16:36

Let people not be mistaken. We are talking about an annual tournament (roughly the Champions Cup but Pacific version) and not a championship (Super Rugby). This future tournament, if it sees the light of day, will give even more importance to the Japanese Pro League and the future Australian New Zealand championship. Everyone wins in this story.

PS: To watch very closely Tokyo Gas (3rd Japanese division). The franchise seems to have gone for a big recruitment and should apply to join the Pro League in 2023. If this team does, it is they who will play in the New Chichibunomiya Stadium (30,000 seats).

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby 4N » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 16:44

Yes, a combined finals format or something like the Champions Cup is what was suggested all along. It’s a win-win like you say. :thumbup:

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby victorsra » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 17:00

Yes, the idea is not strange. Soccer has the AFC Champions League (that doesn't have NZ, but has Australia).
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Sat, 18 Jul 2020, 21:01

Hinato wrote:Let people not be mistaken. We are talking about an annual tournament (roughly the Champions Cup but Pacific version) and not a championship (Super Rugby). This future tournament, if it sees the light of day, will give even more importance to the Japanese Pro League and the future Australian New Zealand championship. Everyone wins in this story.

PS: To watch very closely Tokyo Gas (3rd Japanese division). The franchise seems to have gone for a big recruitment and should apply to join the Pro League in 2023. If this team does, it is they who will play in the New Chichibunomiya Stadium (30,000 seats).


This is something similar to what I was suggesting above (re: the player exodus to Japan). NZ/Aus want some of that sweet Japanese market and Japan wants that Tasman talent. Both sides benefit here.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Rebus » Sun, 19 Jul 2020, 07:52

Agreed , for some countries , it should be about thinking 20 years down the line where they should encourage the opportunity to play in other nations but retain eligibility to the national team.

NZ/Aus will be an obvious target for wealthier nations like Japan and possibly even US in the future , but if they align their domestic competitions and have a Chamions Cup at the end of the season , I cant see what they have to lose. It has happened in a number of sport , like football where players migrate from their home countries to Europe but there is always the assurance they are eligible for international games.

What might be interesting is if Japanese teams start recruiting now and they encourage younger players to move to Japan , is that by the time the 2027 World Cup comes around is that theoretically , insted of a handful of project players like the 2019 World Cup , aside from 5 years of playing a better level of profesional rugby , Japan could have dozens of project players to enhance their squad.

Also , as Japan would be starting from a low number of professional players , would there be a larger recruitment from the PI nations , which would upskill their players and provide a stronger playing base for countries such as Tonga and Samoa. I think the break up of Super Rugby and the development of the Japanese League could be one of the best things to happen to Asian rugby

As a side note , would countries with small playing pools like Scotland , Italy and Argentina might start pushing for changes in the eligibility rules.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Sun, 19 Jul 2020, 10:29

Rebus wrote:Agreed , for some countries , it should be about thinking 20 years down the line where they should encourage the opportunity to play in other nations but retain eligibility to the national team.

NZ/Aus will be an obvious target for wealthier nations like Japan and possibly even US in the future , but if they align their domestic competitions and have a Chamions Cup at the end of the season , I cant see what they have to lose. It has happened in a number of sport , like football where players migrate from their home countries to Europe but there is always the assurance they are eligible for international games.

What might be interesting is if Japanese teams start recruiting now and they encourage younger players to move to Japan , is that by the time the 2027 World Cup comes around is that theoretically , insted of a handful of project players like the 2019 World Cup , aside from 5 years of playing a better level of profesional rugby , Japan could have dozens of project players to enhance their squad.

Also , as Japan would be starting from a low number of professional players , would there be a larger recruitment from the PI nations , which would upskill their players and provide a stronger playing base for countries such as Tonga and Samoa. I think the break up of Super Rugby and the development of the Japanese League could be one of the best things to happen to Asian rugby

As a side note , would countries with small playing pools like Scotland , Italy and Argentina might start pushing for changes in the eligibility rules.


I think it's interesting in terms of the development and alignment of leagues. From an Australian point of view initially with whatever comes from SR in the region and the linking up with the Japanese structures to establishment a Cup competition. It will certainly have significant benefits for Rugby in the Asian-Pacific region in the long term. But I think their could be opportunities to establish further relationships with other emerging leagues or nations opting to run their structures in the same window such as MLR and SLAR. Take the Pacific Nations Cup for instance. There could be the opportunity to really strengthen and develop that structure seeing as all the potential nations could have their players involved playing along similar timetables.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby theDarky » Sun, 19 Jul 2020, 12:26

Tobar wrote:
Hinato wrote:Let people not be mistaken. We are talking about an annual tournament (roughly the Champions Cup but Pacific version) and not a championship (Super Rugby). This future tournament, if it sees the light of day, will give even more importance to the Japanese Pro League and the future Australian New Zealand championship. Everyone wins in this story.

PS: To watch very closely Tokyo Gas (3rd Japanese division). The franchise seems to have gone for a big recruitment and should apply to join the Pro League in 2023. If this team does, it is they who will play in the New Chichibunomiya Stadium (30,000 seats).


This is something similar to what I was suggesting above (re: the player exodus to Japan). NZ/Aus want some of that sweet Japanese market and Japan wants that Tasman talent. Both sides benefit here.


But on a long term does Japan need the tasman teams ?

they need the talents so they can sign them directly

If the Japanese league is a success I dont see how NZ/Aus unions can keep their players to feed their super rugby teams.

These teams risk to finish as some development teams for the Japanese clubs.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Tobar » Sun, 19 Jul 2020, 14:31

theDarky wrote:
Tobar wrote:
Hinato wrote:Let people not be mistaken. We are talking about an annual tournament (roughly the Champions Cup but Pacific version) and not a championship (Super Rugby). This future tournament, if it sees the light of day, will give even more importance to the Japanese Pro League and the future Australian New Zealand championship. Everyone wins in this story.

PS: To watch very closely Tokyo Gas (3rd Japanese division). The franchise seems to have gone for a big recruitment and should apply to join the Pro League in 2023. If this team does, it is they who will play in the New Chichibunomiya Stadium (30,000 seats).


This is something similar to what I was suggesting above (re: the player exodus to Japan). NZ/Aus want some of that sweet Japanese market and Japan wants that Tasman talent. Both sides benefit here.


But on a long term does Japan need the tasman teams ?

they need the talents so they can sign them directly

If the Japanese league is a success I dont see how NZ/Aus unions can keep their players to feed their super rugby teams.

These teams risk to finish as some development teams for the Japanese clubs.


New Zealand already keeps plenty of players that don’t go to Europe to cash out. They are more players leaving now but as we can see from SR Aotearoa there are plenty of great players, both capped and uncapped. Of course with the Japanese league that will increase the amount of players headed there but I don’t think that there will be a talent drain. South Africans, Pacific Islanders and evening Argentinians will be the first players to try and head overseas.

New Zealand still controls anyone interested in potentially being an All Black. These are the best players in the country. If Japan wants access to them then they have to work with the union to allow that, otherwise they have to hope they can just pull the players away with big salaries.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Working Class Rugger » Sun, 19 Jul 2020, 18:07

theDarky wrote:
Tobar wrote:
Hinato wrote:Let people not be mistaken. We are talking about an annual tournament (roughly the Champions Cup but Pacific version) and not a championship (Super Rugby). This future tournament, if it sees the light of day, will give even more importance to the Japanese Pro League and the future Australian New Zealand championship. Everyone wins in this story.

PS: To watch very closely Tokyo Gas (3rd Japanese division). The franchise seems to have gone for a big recruitment and should apply to join the Pro League in 2023. If this team does, it is they who will play in the New Chichibunomiya Stadium (30,000 seats).


This is something similar to what I was suggesting above (re: the player exodus to Japan). NZ/Aus want some of that sweet Japanese market and Japan wants that Tasman talent. Both sides benefit here.


But on a long term does Japan need the tasman teams ?

they need the talents so they can sign them directly

If the Japanese league is a success I dont see how NZ/Aus unions can keep their players to feed their super rugby teams.

These teams risk to finish as some development teams for the Japanese clubs.


There's also the element of accessing Rugby economies in regards to fans and there relative financial strength. Both of which Australia and New Zealand possess. But it's a development element most of all at the younger ages. Exposing Japanese youth to tougher competition earlier will see them develop into better professionals in the future.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby khanhspm » Tue, 21 Jul 2020, 10:33

Australia court Sunwolves for go-it-alone competition if trans-Tasman Super Rugby series founders

Sunwolves and Fijian and Argentinian teams about joining an eight-team competition in case a trans-Tasman Super Rugby competition fails to get past first base.

Sydney's Daily Telegraph reported that the Sunwolves, Fijian Drua and an Argentinian franchise would be invited to base themselves in Australia for an eight-team competition due to travel restrictions following the Covid-19 pandemic.

A Rugby Australia spokesman told the Sydney Morning Herald the Sunwolves' participation would have to be funded by the Japan Rugby Football Union.

But the Daily Telegraph understood "the JRFU would now be willing to fund the Sunwolves and accommodate them in Australia, given it is unlikely Japan could host matches early next year''.

The Australians are making the move in case no agreement is reached with New Zealand Rugby (NZ) over a trans-Tasman competition.

NZR has proposed a tournament featuring eight to 10 teams, including five New Zealand sides and, potentially, an Auckland-based Pasifika team.

But NZR has suggested just two or three Australian teams be invited.

Rugby Australia is insisting on five teams - the Reds, Waratahs, Rebels, Brumbies and the Western Force - be involved.

The Daily Telegraph claimed if "all five won’t be accepted into the Kiwi-planned trans-Tasman tournament, it’s ­expected RA will go it alone''.

The Sunwolves were to be cut from Super Rugby after the 2020 series after five seasons' participation since 2016.

The Western Force - backed by Western Australian mining tycoon Andrew 'Twiggy' Forrest - took part in Super Rugby from 2006 to 2017 before being dropped when competition numbers were reduced from 18 to 15.

Forrest set up the Global Rapid Rugby competition in 2018, with teams from China, Fiji, Samoa, Malaysia and Hong Kong joining the Force in a six-team tournament.

The Fijian Drua have played in Australia’s now-defunct National Rugby Competition, winning the title in 2018.

Meanwhile, the Melbourne Rebels have rejected a claim from former Wallaby Stephen Hoiles that the club does not deserve to be in a trans-Tasman Super Rugby.

Rebels boss Baden Stephenson told the Sydney Morning Herald that Hoiles was "entitled to his view''.

"I’m not concerned by what others have got to say or their opinions,” Stephenson said. “I’m just really confident with how things are tracking, and we’re working closely with RA. I know internally a lot of the good things that we’re doing as a club and how we’re positioning ourselves. Our future is pretty bright.

“We’ve been the second-best performed team in 2018 and 2019, we’ve got stability across our leadership and the highest growth rate in participation numbers … and some private investment, government support, long-term partnerships.

“Do we want to be more consistent on the field with results? Absolutely. From where the club was and where it is now, I think we’re tracking in the right direction. I’m not too concerned about what others are saying.”
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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Tue, 21 Jul 2020, 11:25

It is nothing but a threat from the Australians. It is an infeasible championship. Jaguares and Sunwolves no longer exist. Too many long trips (economically it does not hold water), the Argentinian players are exiled in Europe and the Japanese are preparing their future Pro League.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby RugbyLiebe » Tue, 21 Jul 2020, 11:51

Hinato wrote:It is nothing but a threat from the Australians. It is an infeasible championship. Jaguares and Sunwolves no longer exist. Too many long trips (economically it does not hold water), the Argentinian players are exiled in Europe and the Japanese are preparing their future Pro League.


In this article, they say, that they will be in Australia for the whole competition, that would cut the long trips. No idea how the newspaper's sources are, but under the given recircumstances with Covid-19 around, this doesn't sound totally unrealistic to me.
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Look at the world ranking in July. Teams ranked 1-10 have to play one team from 11-20 (they don't play in a regular competition) away the next year. 11-20 play 21-30 away and so on. Yes, it really is that simple.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Wed, 22 Jul 2020, 18:42

The last season of Top League will be played with 25 teams!
https://www.asierugby.com/post/la-derni ... 3%A9quipes

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby theDarky » Thu, 23 Jul 2020, 08:46

Hinato wrote:The last season of Top League will be played with 25 teams!
https://www.asierugby.com/post/la-derni ... 3%A9quipes


So they want to give their places in the different pro divisions using this competition

I think if they want to move a franchise or two after it gonna create many tensions.

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Re: Japan Rugby

Postby Hinato » Mon, 27 Jul 2020, 06:31

Naoya Okubo appointed head coach of Yamaha Jubilo

Yamaha Jubilo has just struck a big blow by signing Naoya Okubo. The former head coach of the Sunwolves (the 5th in 5 Super Rugby seasons) is thus appointed head coach of the Iwata franchise. He will be assisted by Mose Tuiali'i (forwards), Tatsuhiko Otao (rear) and Shin Hasegawa (scrum), already present in the staff last season.


Former Japanese international (23 caps), Naoya Okubo already has a long experience at the high level. Forward coach of Suntory Sungoliath in 2011, he was the manager of this team from 2012 to 2015 before becoming the forward coach of NTT Shining Arcs.


At the end of 2019, he was named the first and only Japanese head coach of a Super Rugby franchise. The Japanese technician is the latest name to leave the Sunwolves. His deputy Keisuke Sawaki thus took control of the Canon Eagles. Yamaha Jubilo can count on one of the very best current Japanese trainers!

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