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Multi-sport Cities

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 20:53

Isn't soccer too much linked to protestant unionism in Northern Ireland? They expeled from the league the main catholic club in the 1940s, the Belfast Celtic and I remember even by the 2000 a catholic Northern Irish player needed to retire from the national team after death threats....
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 21:23

victorsra wrote:Isn't soccer too much linked to protestant unionism in Northern Ireland? They expeled from the league the main catholic club in the 1940s, the Belfast Celtic and I remember even by the 2000 a catholic Northern Irish player needed to retire from the national team after death threats....


That pretty much sums up Ireland. They couldn't get on so they get their own countries and their own teams.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 21:37

But how is rugby in Northern Ireland. Is Ulster Rugby predominantly Protestant or there is a mix? Because Munster Rugby is mainly Catholic, right?
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Figaro » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 21:46

I think spectator wise Gaelic Football, Rugby and Soccer (in that order) are well ahead of the other sports in Ireland. At least that's my impression. Gaelic Football is massive. I'm surprised it's never really expanded beyond Ireland, it's pretty fun and simple sport to watch and easy to get into. They could probably sustain expat teams all over England and perk up the interest of enough others to sustain a UK league

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 22:01

victorsra wrote:But how is rugby in Northern Ireland. Is Ulster Rugby predominantly Protestant or there is a mix? Because Munster Rugby is mainly Catholic, right?


Yes you're right. But in rugby we all love each other.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Mon, 22 Jun 2020, 22:16

Figaro wrote:I think spectator wise Gaelic Football, Rugby and Soccer (in that order) are well ahead of the other sports in Ireland. At least that's my impression. Gaelic Football is massive. I'm surprised it's never really expanded beyond Ireland, it's pretty fun and simple sport to watch and easy to get into. They could probably sustain expat teams all over England and perk up the interest of enough others to sustain a UK league


But Belfast (Antim) realy sucks in GAA. So, who are Ulster's fans? Mix of Catholics and Protestants (and people that don't care) or basicaly Protestants?
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby sk 88 » Thu, 25 Jun 2020, 15:04

victorsra wrote:But how is rugby in Northern Ireland. Is Ulster Rugby predominantly Protestant or there is a mix? Because Munster Rugby is mainly Catholic, right?


Ulster was predominantly protestant and is now 50/50. Rugby is and has been strong in Ulster's protestant grammar schools for a long time. Northern Ireland (Ulster less 3 counties) still has segregated schooling for catholics and protestant (yes in the UK in 2020, why no one cares is beyond me), I understand efforts are made to include Belfast catholics. Rural Ireland is a bit different, smaller populations, religion worn more lightly, fewer people randomly murdered for praying to god the wrong way.

Within Ireland (or Leinster, Connacht, Munster), they are overwhelmingly catholic now. The Church of Ireland (protestant denomination) shrank a lot after the civil war and partition. Graham Norton the TV present was brought up protestant in southern Ireland. In Dublin it is very associated with the posh private schools, these were traditionally nicknamed "West Brits" that is to say they were/are catholic but quite up for being part of Britain or associated and traded with Britain. These were the types that ran the IRFU and why rugby "didn't want to mix politics with sport" by even considering splitting. Golf is similar.

Munster (or rather Limerick really) it is a very all society sport. There are still more doctors than dockers in the crowd but its an all types game.

Connacht it is not very popular.

It is in the shade of GAA everywhere. Even in Limerick Thomund Park is significantly smaller than the GAA stadium.

victorsra wrote:Isn't soccer too much linked to protestant unionism in Northern Ireland? They expeled from the league the main catholic club in the 1940s, the Belfast Celtic and I remember even by the 2000 a catholic Northern Irish player needed to retire from the national team after death threats....


Yes. And no. The game itself is played in both communities. The Northern Ireland football team has become a symbol of protestant unionism. Back in the day Martin O'Neil played happily for Northern Ireland, Neil Lennon (the player you mention) was happy and so was Gerry Taggart. It wasn't all happy clappy but catholics played for NI pretty regularly. Then O'Neil and Lennon went to Celtic and it all kicked off. They sent Lennon a bullett in post with his name on it.

Now a lot of NI Catholics play for the Republic of Ireland team (James Mclean, Darron Gibson, Shane Duffy)

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Tobar » Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 00:24

thatrugbyguy wrote:
Chester-Donnelly wrote:
I don't know how the NFL conference system works, but I think for it to be popular in UK it will need to be the real NFL, not a European copy, so I think a European conference would be the best option.
2 teams in UK?. I would probably put them both in London. Maybe one in West London and one in East London.


If I'm not mistaken the NFL conference system works on some type of rotational basis. 32 teams split into 2 Conferences with 4 divisions within each. Everyone plays their divisional rivals twice a year for 6 games, the other 10 games are split among teams in their own conference and the rival conference. Over a 2 or 3 year period all 32 teams eventually play each other home and away. Or something along those lines but that's my understanding. I'm sure one of the Americans here will point out how wrong I am though, lol.


This is pretty much it. Here’s how it breaks down:

6 games against division rivals
8 games against all teams in one AFC division and one NFC division
2 games against the team from another same conference division that finished in the same place as your team the year before (I’ll explain with an example)

So let’s take my beloved New York Jets of the AFC East and look at their 2020 schedule. AFC is the conference, East is the division.

6 games (Home and Away) against the other AFC East teams
4 games against the AFC West
4 games against the NFC West teams
2 games against the 3rd place AFC North and AFC South teams (because the Jets finished in 3rd place in their division in 2019).

So basically they play 12 games against AFC opponents and 4 games against NFC opponents. This rotates each season and everyone else in their division has essentially the same schedule, with the exception of the 2 other same conference standing teams.

Lemme know if this makes sense.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 02:04

Cheers, we both like green :P
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby thatrugbyguy » Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 04:56

I always thought it would far easier just playing everyone in your conference once for 15 games, and then a rivalry match against each teams biggest opponent for 16 games. I support the Denver Broncos. When NFL started to become popular in the early 90's in Australia everyone I know chose either the Dallas Cowboys or the Los Angeles (/Oakland/Las Vegas) Raiders. For some strange reason I picked Denver for reasons I cannot remember. They were not a very good team in the early 90's. Neither were the Golden State Warriors in the NBA. For reasons I cannot explain I picked really average American teams to support, lol.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 17:53

thatrugbyguy wrote:I always thought it would far easier just playing everyone in your conference once for 15 games, and then a rivalry match against each teams biggest opponent for 16 games. I support the Denver Broncos. When NFL started to become popular in the early 90's in Australia everyone I know chose either the Dallas Cowboys or the Los Angeles (/Oakland/Las Vegas) Raiders. For some strange reason I picked Denver for reasons I cannot remember. They were not a very good team in the early 90's. Neither were the Golden State Warriors in the NBA. For reasons I cannot explain I picked really average American teams to support, lol.


I think they basicaly want to make sure once every four every years everybody will have played everybody. And, if I'm not wrong, everybody also hosts everybody once every 4 years because of the rotation of the groups you face all teams.

If it was the way you said some teams would basicaly never play each other.
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 10:42

This is how I would rank Britain and Ireland's cities for sports.

1. London
2. Dublin
3. Manchester
4. Glasgow
5. Cardiff
6. Belfast
7. Leicester
8. Bristol
9. Leeds
10. Worcester
11. Newcastle
12. Coventry
13. Nottingham
14. Sheffield
15. Birmingham
16. Edinburgh

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Figaro » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 21:00

victorsra wrote:But how is rugby in Northern Ireland. Is Ulster Rugby predominantly Protestant or there is a mix? Because Munster Rugby is mainly Catholic, right?


Ulster rugby is extremely Protestant to my understanding, to the point that some Belfast Catholics support Leinster instead.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby ThreePears » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 22:26

Chester-Donnelly wrote:This is how I would rank Britain and Ireland's cities for sports.

1. London
2. Dublin
3. Manchester
4. Glasgow
5. Cardiff
6. Belfast
7. Leicester
8. Bristol
9. Leeds
10. Worcester
11. Newcastle
12. Coventry
13. Nottingham
14. Sheffield
15. Birmingham
16. Edinburgh


To be honest that list speaks volumes about my home City, Worcester. A smallish place of only 100,000 yet a premier netball, basketball, cricket and rugby sides. The basketball and cricket teams are very very decent at that too and who knows, maybe the rugby team are getting there too. It is only the football side letting the City down, and that has always been the case.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Sun, 28 Jun 2020, 23:40

ThreePears wrote:
Chester-Donnelly wrote:This is how I would rank Britain and Ireland's cities for sports.

1. London
2. Dublin
3. Manchester
4. Glasgow
5. Cardiff
6. Belfast
7. Leicester
8. Bristol
9. Leeds
10. Worcester
11. Newcastle
12. Coventry
13. Nottingham
14. Sheffield
15. Birmingham
16. Edinburgh


To be honest that list speaks volumes about my home City, Worcester. A smallish place of only 100,000 yet a premier netball, basketball, cricket and rugby sides. The basketball and cricket teams are very very decent at that too and who knows, maybe the rugby team are getting there too. It is only the football side letting the City down, and that has always been the case.


What Worcester is achieving in sport is very impressive. I can't really explain why Worcester is so good at sports, but I think not having a big football club helps. Many cities have one big football club and no other professional sports teams, e.g. Wolverhampton. And of course the university and the university arena are also very important.
Britain has a serious lack of indoor arenas. I also think that once somewhere becomes known as a sports city it starts to attract other sports teams. When the Netball Superleague expanded in 2017 it added teams from Worcester and Coventry, not a team from Birmingham, which is what I could imagine happening because some people still call Birmingham, England's second city.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Tue, 30 Jun 2020, 12:26

Having done a bit more research on Irish sport and Irish cities, I have found there are two more multi-sport cities in Ireland which deserve to be on the list.

Cork is Ireland's second largest city. It is home to one of the country's best soccer teams and one of the top county hurling teams. It is one of the venues for the Munster rugby team and has 2 teams in the All Ireland League Division 1A for rugby. It also has a provincial cricket team called Munster Reds.

Galway is the home of the Connacht rugby team. Galway also has top level county teams in Gaelic football and hurling.

This is my updated rankings of Britain and Ireland's cities for sports.

1. London
2. Dublin
3. Manchester
4. Glasgow
5. Cardiff
6. Belfast
7. Leicester
8. Bristol
9. Leeds
10. Worcester
11. Cork
12. Newcastle
13. Coventry
14. Nottingham
15. Galway
16. Sheffield
17. Birmingham
18. Edinburgh

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby TheStroBro » Tue, 30 Jun 2020, 16:38

Only Rugby is professional in Ireland though.

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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby victorsra » Tue, 30 Jun 2020, 16:47

Soccer is professional in Ireland. Very bad, but their league is pro afaik.
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Re: Multi-sport Cities

Postby Chester-Donnelly » Tue, 30 Jun 2020, 17:36

TheStroBro wrote:Only Rugby is professional in Ireland though.


Yes only rugby is professional. The other popular sports I think are all semi professional; Gaelic football, hurling, soccer.

https://www.irishnews.com/sport/gaafoot ... al-844702/

I would guess the interprovincial cricket teams would be a mix of full time professionals and semi professionals.

I believe Belfast Giants ice hockey team is professional.

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