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2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby victorsra » Sat, 20 Feb 2021, 17:31

In Brazilian Portuguese, "De boas intenções o inferno está cheio" :lol: Same idea.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby Canalina » Sat, 20 Feb 2021, 19:44

Anyway it's important to have the qualifiers restarted. In the past 350 days just one match was played, Samoa v Tonga. This is a restart.
From a quick search on google there are still no news about Kenya-Colombia, while about the asian tournament a source says

These encounters were scheduled to take place in Hong Kong on 5, 9 and 13 will be pushed back to 2 Quarter.

Second quarter should mean april-june

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby johnbirch » Sat, 20 Feb 2021, 20:57

Canalina wrote:Anyway it's important to have the qualifiers restarted. In the past 350 days just one match was played, Samoa v Tonga. This is a restart.
From a quick search on google there are still no news about Kenya-Colombia, while about the asian tournament a source says

These encounters were scheduled to take place in Hong Kong on 5, 9 and 13 will be pushed back to 2 Quarter.

Second quarter should mean april-june
And then they have to fit in the repechage after that... running short of time!

Asian championship/qualifier cancelled apparently because Japan could not travel, so it all presumably depends on Japanese government policy.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby thatrugbyguy » Sun, 21 Feb 2021, 03:01

Armchair Fan wrote:There is sexism. A different question is how big a deal do we consider it. An interview as preview of the first Rugby Europe women test match in a year where a single question/answer is properly related to the game is a poor effort. One could even understand such a take from a local newspaper, but in the website of a union, well...


Asking a female rugby players about having kids and how it affects her playing the game is as far as I'm concerned a perfectly reasonable question to ask, because women have to go through different things to men and it's going to affect how they prepare for their matches. I don't understand this issue of treating men and woman as if they are the same thing, because they're not. If anything, I would argue that treating women's rugby players as women and getting them to open up about the different challenges they face compared to the men is exactly how you get more women and girls interested in women's rugby. Women connect on a different level to men, for guys it is very much about a physical thing, for women they approach things from a more empathetic position. So, as far as I'm concerned if you want to get more women interested in women's rugby you can't just rely on the athletic side of things, you have to appeal to things women connect with, and part of that is something like how kids affects your preparations because it is going to be different. Sexism is about looking down on women in a negative way. Talking about the different challenges that a women has to go through to play rugby isn't - it's just being honest.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby johnbirch » Sun, 21 Feb 2021, 10:45

thatrugbyguy wrote:
Armchair Fan wrote:There is sexism. A different question is how big a deal do we consider it. An interview as preview of the first Rugby Europe women test match in a year where a single question/answer is properly related to the game is a poor effort. One could even understand such a take from a local newspaper, but in the website of a union, well...


Asking a female rugby players about having kids and how it affects her playing the game is as far as I'm concerned a perfectly reasonable question to ask, because women have to go through different things to men and it's going to affect how they prepare for their matches. I don't understand this issue of treating men and woman as if they are the same thing, because they're not. If anything, I would argue that treating women's rugby players as women and getting them to open up about the different challenges they face compared to the men is exactly how you get more women and girls interested in women's rugby. Women connect on a different level to men, for guys it is very much about a physical thing, for women they approach things from a more empathetic position. So, as far as I'm concerned if you want to get more women interested in women's rugby you can't just rely on the athletic side of things, you have to appeal to things women connect with, and part of that is something like how kids affects your preparations because it is going to be different. Sexism is about looking down on women in a negative way. Talking about the different challenges that a women has to go through to play rugby isn't - it's just being honest.

There is asking about the physical challenge of returning to play after the birth of a child in an interview - much as you might ask a man about returning to play after a long break. That is fine. But there is also spending at least 80% of a pre-tounament interview talking about her child and what she and her husband talk about. That is not.

Sportsmen are often fathers but I have never heard a man asked about the effect of leaving their child to go and play sport somewhere, or what their wives think about it. Not once. Yet leaving young children must affect fathers too - they are not all emotionless brutes.

And I said its like the 1980s because, from a UK perspective, it is. The UK press of the time - when it featured women's rugby at all - always had stories their stories based around the unstated "she plays a tough man's game but she's a woman underneath". It is an attitude that keeps sportswomen in second place, concentrating on the second part of the word "sportswoman" rather than the first, implying that women donot take sport as seriously as men.

There is a place to discuss the effect of being a sporting international on family life (for women and men) and that is in features - not the principle (indeed only) pre-tournament interview in the main sports pages.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby thatrugbyguy » Sun, 21 Feb 2021, 13:38

What keeps women in second place is treating them like they are men. The biggest issue in getting women's sports greater coverage is there's a lack of women watching. Men are not only watching mens sports, they watch women's sports too. The overwhelming viewership for women's sports are men. And part of this I believe is because women need more than just the athleticism to watch their fellow females play. Women like connecting with each other in more social way. Not once have I ever seen a women's sporting league ever really attempt to address this with the exception of Netball, and that's because Netball knows exactly who its audience is. It's literally the only sport where women don't require subsidies from their male counterparts in order to earn a living. Too often I see sports like rugby try and make the women look as tough and as hard as the men. That's a losing strategy. So, why not look to what appeals to women and adapt it for rugby?

The analogy I will use is the film Wonder Woman. It's the only superhero film ever made that had a larger percentage of women watching than men. Why is that? Because the film was created to appeal to what women's tastes are. It wasn't just a superhero film with action and explosions, it had elements of fairytales, adventure, romance, etc, and a leading lady who had all the qualities that women desire, compassion, love, beauty, confidence and strength. Compare that to female led Captain Marvel film where its audience was overwhelming male because it catered to mens tastes first, sci-fi, action, laser beams, fighter jets, explosions, etc. Sport has failed to recognise this difference in audiences. You say it yourself if any focus is placed on the face the sportsperson is female she's not taken as seriously. Why on earth should a woman have to be looked at through the same light as a male to be taken seriously? Why on earth should a woman being a mother or a wife not be celebrated in a sporting context? Why shouldn't those stories be told? Because some feminist on Twitter gets her underwear in a twist? Why on earth shouldn't female qualities be accepted in a sporting arena? That's the real attitude shift that needs to happen. Sport shouldn't be trying to make woman come across as men in order to get people to 'take them more seriously'. No, sport needs to expand what should be taken seriously in the first place. I guarantee that if more sporting organisations approached the marketing of their women's teams in a way that actually play to what women like about each other then you'll see more girls playing, and more women watching. Returning to Wonder Woman, I cannot tell you the number of women who I have heard say they want to be best friends with the actress Gal Gadot. That's what's missing in sport. If you only focus on the athleticism you will only ever get the sporty girls interested.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby victorsra » Sun, 21 Feb 2021, 22:22

People that watch T2 rugby or low level rugby in any level know the difference between levels and can enjoy both matches. You don't watch the Shute Shield expecting to see a game like Super Rugby. You don't watch Rugby Europe Championship wanting to watch a match like the Six Nations. So, why would one watch a women's match expecting to see a men's match?

Matches must be the best they can according to their own relaity. And public must expect exactly this. To compare men's and women's games is like to compare different levels of men's game. Women's rugby is amateur, just to start. People only need to be fair. Any match can be awesome and realy enjoyable if you know what to expect.

Anyway, I don't know why this problem always appear. Women's rugby is constantly improving, so, what's realy the matter now? I realy think women's 15s is an area where World Rugby is having more success than deserves criticism. We were critics about the number of RWC, they expended. We were critics about RWC with poor stadiums, they improved and clearly want to improve more. What is needed now is a strong anual calendar and AFAIK they are working on it. After the calendar structure, the question will lie in professionalism.

What is realy needed is to have more coverage on rugby's media. Idiots will always be trolling, but you can't get rid of them. Only time does this job.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby Canalina » Mon, 22 Feb 2021, 07:32

Highlights of Spain v Russia, with the early elegant dropgoal by Argudo


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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby snapper37 » Mon, 22 Feb 2021, 17:28

Canalina wrote:Highlights of Spain v Russia, with the early elegant dropgoal by Argudo




Spain has some speed and talent. Hopefully we see them in the world cup. they will show well.

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Re: 2021 Womens Rugby World Cup

Postby Armchair Fan » Mon, 22 Feb 2021, 18:06

I really hope to be wrong but I don't think it's reasonable to expect Spain to beat Ireland. Last game against Scotland was truly horrible. Two years ago, when Ireland experienced a low point and 7s players still made a difference, maybe. But I fear we are in for some tough years.

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